Recent Submissions

  • Comparative and combined effectiveness of innovative therapies in cancer: A literature review (Published Online)

    Geldof, Tine; Rawal, Smita; Van Dyck, Walter; Huys, Isabelle (Future Medicine Ltd, 2019)
    To achieve therapeutic innovation in oncology, already expensive novel medicines are often concomitantly combined to potentially enhance effectiveness. While this aggravates the pricing problem, comparing effectiveness of novel yet expensive (concomitant) treatments is much needed for healthcare decision-making to deliver effective but affordable treatments. This study reviewed published clinical trials and real-world studies of targeted and immune therapies. In total, 48 studies compared and/or combined multiple novel products on breast, colorectal, lung and melanoma cancers. To a great extent, products evaluated in each study were owned by one manufacturer. However, cross-manufacturer assessments are also needed. Next to costs and intensive market competition, the absence of a regulatory framework enforcing real-world multiproduct studies prevents these from being conducted. Trusted third parties could facilitate such real-world studies, for which appropriate and efficient data access is needed.
  • Why some are more equal: Family firm heterogeneity and the effect on management’s attention to CSR (Published Online)

    Fehre, Kerstin; Weber, Florian (Wiley, 2019)
    Research at the family firm–Corporate Social Responsibility (CSR) nexus lacks agreement about whether family firms are more or less socially responsible than their non‐family counterparts, which leads discussion relating to the bright and dark side of socioemotional wealth (SEW). We add to this ongoing debate in two different ways. First, we build on family firm heterogeneity and argue for a gray side to SEW, located between the bright and dark sides that is dependent upon the kind of family firm ownership. Second, we assume that prior research on a diverse set of CSR behaviors may, to some extent, explain the contradicting results; thus, we propose going back a step and focusing on management’s attention to CSR as an important antecedent of CSR behavior. By analyzing the letters to the shareholders of German HDAX firms from 2003 to 2012, this study finds that family ownership positively affects management’s attention to CSR, mainly driven by founders and family foundations. The research adds to our understanding of the family firm–CSR nexus by scrutinizing the role SEW plays in management’s attention to CSR when it comes to family firm heterogeneity.
  • The performance of acquisitions by high default risk bidders (Accepted)

    Bruyland, Evy; Lasfer, Meziane; De Maeseneire, Wouter; Song, Wei (Elsevier, 2019)
    We investigate the takeover strategies of high default risk acquirers and their value impact. We find that these bidders select bigger, less profitable and unrelated targets, pursue transactions during recessions, and pay with shares by offering target shareholders high premiums. Their long-term buy-and-hold returns are extremely negative, and reflect fundamentally their substantial drop in profitability combined with high leverage. We show that the well-established long-run under performance of acquiring firms is largely driven by this sub-set of acquirers. The results are similar when we use alternative measures of default risk and performance, and a global sample of non-US bidders.
  • Alliander: Power to the people (C)

    Debruyne, Marion; Meeus, Leonardo; Hadush, Samson Yemane (2017)
    This is part of a case series. The aim of this three part teaching case is to stimulate discussion on how companies can adopt new business models to survive sector-wide transitions by taking the perspective of energy network companies which often operate under a highly regulated environment.
  • Alliander: Power to the people (B)

    Debruyne, Marion; Meeus, Leonardo; Hadush, Samson Yemane (2017)
    This is part of a case series. The aim of this three part teaching case is to stimulate discussion on how companies can adopt new business models to survive sector-wide transitions by taking the perspective of energy network companies which often operate under a highly regulated environment.
  • Customer innovation: Delivering a customer-led strategy for sustainable growth

    Debruyne, Marion; Tackx, Koen (Kogan Page, 2019)
    Many organizations approach customer-centic marketing and innovating their business strategy in isolation to one another, missing groundbreaking opportunities for advancement. Customer Innovation, second edition, turns this on its head by starting with the customer, innovating around their needs, then building a customer led business strategy around it. It presents a well-constructed three-by-three formula of connect, convert, collaborate, laying the foundations for innovation and change, to improve the current customer journey and expand into new customer horizons. This enables new product and service development to flow with outstanding efficiency and substantial growth. Customer Innovation, second edition, includes exciting updates around co-creation and the benefits of involving customers, stakeholders and employees from the beginning. It provides guidance on using technology to reinvent traditional business models, with consumer needs at the heart. With a spectacular range of case studies, including Disney, LEGO and Johnson & Johnson, all delivered with active takeaways, this is the ultimate handbook for any leader, business or marketing strategist, ready to pave the way in a new era of customer led strategy.
  • Managing cost and earned value

    Vanhoucke, Mario (Gower Publishing, 2014)
    This Handbook was the first APM Body of Knowledge Approved title for the Association for Project Management. Over the course of five editions, Gower Handbook of Project Management has become the definitive desk reference for project management practitioners. The Handbook gives an introduction to, and overview of, the essential knowledge required for managing projects.
  • Adding value and HRM practice: evidence-based HR

    Buyens, Dirk; Verbrigghe, Jasmijn (Springer, 2015)
    We argue that although HR has a lot of tools and practices, it still lacks an overarching decision science that defines how organizations can obtain strategic success through their human resources. In order to support companies’ informed HRM decision-making, we recommend establishing a tradition of evidencebased HR practices. Evidence-based HR is a family of practices, combining research evidence with contextual information and individual judgment of HR professionals as essential sources of information. After having reviewed implications for HR practice from scholarly work, economic and societal trends as well as business tools from other managerial domains, we discuss the potential of Talentship as an evidence-based decision science and as a first step towards a general way of thinking to support HR decisions. As such, we believe the present chapter provides a significant contribution to the insights of practitioners and scholars into the further development towards evidencebased HR.
  • E-business strategy: How companies are shaping their manufacturing and supply chain through the internet. A review and outlook

    Vereecke, Ann; Kalchschmidt, Matteo (Springer, 2016)
    The original paper investigated, on a large sample of manufacturing firms, the adoption of Internet-based tools to support supply chain processes. Four strategies are identified, according to the level of adoption of e-commerce, e-procurement and e-operations. The four strategies are subsequently analysed according to contingent factors and supply chain integration mechanisms. Results show a clear relationship between the use of Internet-based tools and the adoption of integration mechanisms. The commentary shows that the paper has been widely cited in both operations, supply chain and ICT literature, recognizing its seminal contribution to the analysis of the impact of Internet technologies on supply chain processes, their relations with supply chain integration and their impact on performance. The research directions suggested in the original papers are discussed analyzing the subsequent literature, including the replication studies performed by the original authors. The importance of investigating emerging topics, as well as observing their evolution over time, is highlighted.
  • Customers the day after tomorrow. Hoe trek je klanten aan in een wereld van AI, bots en automatisering.

    Van Belleghem, Steven (LannooCampus, 2017)
    Hoe je automatisering en artificiële intelligentie omzet in klantvoordelen We belanden stilaan in de derde fase van digitalisering: de fase van verregaande automatisering en artificiële intelligentie. Die verschuiving zal de relatie tussen bedrijven en klanten radicaal veranderen. Willen bedrijven klantgericht blijven, dan moeten ze op zoek naar aangepaste klantenstrategieën. Dit boek gidst je door de nieuwste fase van digitalisering en reikt je de mindset aan om in de 'Day After Tomorrow' je bedrijf te blijven optimaliseren. Alleen zo slaag je erin de meest briljante digitale ontwikkelingen met de meest unieke menselijke skills te verenigen.
  • The relationship between demand pull attention and radical product innovation: Evidence through computer-aided text analysis

    Biehl, Esther; Fehre, Kerstin; Tietze, Marco (Emerald Publishing Limited, 2018)
    This study updates the discussion on demand-pull attention as a source of radical product innovation. Demand-pull attention shows an ex ante alignment with market characteristics and needs as opposed to pushing resources toward markets. The authors suggest a holistic framework and specify three dimensions of demand-pull attention: anticipated or revealed market demand, market environment, and external economic environment. Based on a large German longitudinal panel consisting of 941 firm-year observations from 2003 to 2013, the authors conceptualized the measurement of demand-pull dimensions’ attention and radical product innovation using computer-aided text analysis of annual reports. The authors analyzed the relationship between the attention that a firm pays to different demand-pull dimensions and the firm’s strategic intention to radically innovate; thus, the authors actually focused on the cognitive sources of radical product innovations. This chapter suggests that radical product innovation activities are positively driven by attention toward the market environment and market demand orientation. However, the hypothesis, which assumed a negative relationship between attention toward the external economic environment and radical innovation, could not be significantly confirmed. This demands a closer look into the underlying decision processes of firms when deciding on radical product innovations. With the theoretical grounding on the attention-based view of the firm, the authors contribute to a better understanding of the role that organizational cognition plays in innovation processes.
  • Attitudes of family firms toward outside investors: The importance of organizational identification

    Neckebrouck, Jeroen; Manigart, Sophie; Meuleman, Miguel (Routledge, 2018)
    More and more family firms open their capital for outside investors, yet existing studies mainly conclude that family firms are more reluctant than nonfamily firms to hand over control to outside investors. In this study, we build on an organizational identification perspective to explore why family firms differ in their attitudes toward outside investors. We hypothesize that family members who identify strongly with their firms are less willing to cede control to outside investors and, if they do cede control, have a stronger preference for investors who may readily identify with family firms, such as family offices or high net worth individuals, rather than investors who may not fit well with a familial identity, such as private equity sponsors or financial investors. We also hypothesize that social identification mediates the relationship between important family firm governance characteristics and preferences for outside investor. Exploratory evidence from a sample of Belgian family firms is supportive of most of our predictions.
  • Toon: Eneco's smart platform for selling less energy to the home

    Steve, Muylle; Niraj, Dawar (2018)
    Eneco Group, the second largest utility company in the Netherlands, launched a smart thermostat, Toon, that served as a platform for energy management services. Toon quickly became the gold standard for smart homes in the Netherlands. In January 2017, top management needed to discuss the strategic priorities to keep Toon’s lead and hold off the competition.
  • Analysis of lead time correlation under a base-stock policy (Accepted)

    Hellemans, Tim; Boute, Robert; Van Houdt, Benny (Elsevier, 2019)
    We analyze the impact of lead time correlation on the inventory distribution, assuming a periodic review base-stock policy. We present an efficient method to compute the shortfall distribution for any Markovian lead time process, and we provide structural results when lead times are characterized by a 2-state Markov-modulated process. The latter reveals how lead time correlation increases the inventory variance and enables a closed form for the asymptotic behavior of the shortfall's variance in case the two possible lead time values are sufficiently different. We also establish upper and lower bounds on the inventory variance, which hold for any general time-homogeneous lead time process. Our results are complemented by a numerical experiment that indicates how commonly used approximations of the shortfall distribution mis-specify base-stock levels in the presence of lead time correlation. Not only does the inventory distribution increase in variance as the lead time correlation increases, it also becomes multi-modal.
  • The impact of solution representations on heuristic net present value optimization in discrete time/cost trade-off project scheduling with multiple cash flow and payment models

    Leyman, Pieter; Van Driessche, Niels; Vanhoucke, Mario; De Causmaecker, Patrick (Elsevier, 2019)
    The goal of this paper is to investigate the impact of different solution representations, as part of a metaheuristic approach, on net present value optimization in project scheduling. We specifically consider the discrete time/cost trade-off problem with net present value optimization and apply three payment models from literature. Each of these models determines the timing and size of cash flows from the contractor’s viewpoint. The contribution of this paper to literature is twofold. First, we include cash flow distribution variants in the payment models, to also distinguish between different manners in which value is created and costs are incurred, as part of a general model for the contractor’s cash flow management. This general model is developed in order to explicitly include the progress of activities in the determination of the timing and size of payments to the contractor, which is currently lacking in literature. Second, we employ an iterated local search framework to compare different solution representations and their corresponding local search and repair heuristics. The goal is to unambiguously show that the choice of a solution representation deserves a fair amount of attention, alongside the selection of appropriate diversification and intensification operators, even though this is not always the case in literature. Each part of the proposed algorithm is validated on a large dataset of test instances, generated to allow for a broad comparison of the solution representations. Our results clearly quantify the statistically significant differences between three types of representations for the project scheduling problem under study.
  • Computing project makespan distributions: Markovian PERT networks revisited

    Burgelman, Jeroen; Vanhoucke, Mario (Elsevier, 2019)
    This paper analyses the project completion time distribution in a Markovian PERT network. Several techniques to obtain exact or numerical expressions for the project completion time distribution are evaluated, with the underlying assumption that the activity durations are exponentially distributed random variables. We show that some of the methods advocated in the project scheduling literature are unable to solve standard datasets from the literature. We propose a framework to analyse the applicability, accuracy and sensitivity of different methods to compute project makespan distributions. An alternative data generation process is proposed to benchmark the different methods and the influence of project dataset parameters on the obtained results is extensively assessed.
  • Tolerance limits for project control: An overview of different approaches (Published Online)

    Vanhoucke, Mario (Elsevier, 2018)
    Monitoring the performance of projects in progress and controlling their expected outcome by taking corrective actions is a crucial task for any project manager. Project control systems are in use to quantify the project performance at a certain moment in time, and allow the project manager to predict the expected outcome if no action is taken. Consequently, these systems serve as mechanism that provide warning signals that tell the project manager when it is time to take corrective actions to bring the expected project outcome back on track. In order to trust these generated warning signals, the project manager has to set limits on the provide performance metrics that serve as thresholds for these actions. This paper gives an overview of different approaches discussed in the literature to control projects using such actions thresholds. First and foremost, the paper discusses three classes of actions thresholds,ranging from very easy-to-use rules-of-thumb to more advanced statistical project control methodologies. Each of these tools have been the subject to research studies, each of which aim at showing their power to predict project problems during its progress. In addition, the paper will emphasize the fundamental different between statistical project control using tolerance limits and statistical process control for projects. Finally, three different quality metrics to evaluate the performance of such control methods are presented and discussed.
  • Fine-slicing global value chains: A protection for proprietary content

    Gooris, Julien; Peeters, Carine (2014)
    This study shows that firms adjust the scope of activities entrusted to foreign services production units to adapt their knowledge and content protection strategy to the availability of strong legal protection or internal control mechanisms. We hypothesize and empirically confirm that, when the above mechanisms are not available, firms use the substitute protection mechanism of “fine-slicing” foreign value chain activities to exploit the complementarities that exist between tasks and reduce misappropriation hazard. We also find a positive moderating effect of firm country-specific experience and content value on the propensity to use the fine-slicing mechanism.

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