• When Passion Fades: Disentangling the Temporal Dynamics of Entrepreneurial Passion for Founding

      Collewaert, Veroniek; Anseel, Frederik; Crommelinck, Michiel; De Beuckelaere, A.; Vermeire, Jacob (Journal of Management Studies, 2016)
      This study examines how and why entrepreneurial passion for founding changes over time. In particular, we propose that in the founding phase of a venture's lifecycle entrepreneurs' founding identity centrality will remain stable over time. We also propose, however, that in our sample and time period studied, entrepreneurs' intense positive feelings for founding will decrease over time. On the basis of theories of positive illusion, self-regulation and role theory, we further hypothesize that venture idea change, change in role ambiguity and entrepreneurs' feedback-seeking behaviour are factors that help explain the rate of change in entrepreneurs' intense positive feelings for founding. Using a three-wave longitudinal research design, we find that among a sample of 112 entrepreneurs' identity centrality does not change over time, whereas intense positive feelings for founding decrease over time. Moreover, the more entrepreneurs change their venture ideas, the weaker their decrease in intense positive feelings. Further, we show that entrepreneurs who frequently seek feedback suffer less from reduced positive feelings in response to higher increases in role ambiguity as compared to entrepreneurs who seek less feedback.
    • Why seeking feedback from diverse sources may not be sufficient for stimulating creativity: The role of performance dynamism and creative time pressure

      Sijbom, R.B.L.; Anseel, Frederik; Crommelinck, Michiel; De Beuckelaer, Alain; De Stobbeleir, Katleen (Journal of Organizational Behavior, 2018)
      We explore how the impact of seeking feedback from different sources (i.e., feedback source variety) on employee creativity is shaped by perceptions of the work environment. Specifically, we argue that two contextual factors, namely, performance dynamism (Study 1) and creative time pressure (Study 2), moderate the relationship between feedback source variety and creativity such that under conditions of high performance dynamism and low creative time pressure, individuals benefit from diverse feedback information. In Study 1 (N = 1,031), the results showed that under conditions of high performance dynamism, the relationship between feedback source variety and self-reported creativity was nonlinear, with employee creativity exponentially increasing as a function of feedback source variety. Similarly, in Study 2 (N = 181), we found that under conditions of low creative time pressure, the relationship between feedback source variety and employee creativity was nonlinear, with supervisor-rated creative performance exponentially increasing at higher levels of feedback source variety. Such results highlight that the relationship between feedback source variety and creative performance is affected by the perceptions of the work environment in which feedback is sought.