• A 60 second clip to create change: palm oil role play (round 1)

      Roome (+), Nigel; Louche, Céline (2014)
      On March 17, 2010, Greenpeace launched a new campaign against the conversion of tropical rainforest to industrial palm oil plantations. The campaign directly attacked Nestle because its supply-chain included palm oil from alleged unsustainable sources. The campaign began with a 60 second video clip. Although Nestle was directly targeted by the campaign, other actors such as companies in the same sector, the suppliers and marketers of palm oil, and NGOs protecting the rainforest were also affected. The video went viral within a few days and Greenpeace followed up with other actions. The case is set up as a role play in two rounds. In round 1, students are invited to consider how the Greenpeace campaign might affect each of a set of five actors (but not Nestle). The five actors present their responses to the campaign and this provides a context to round 2. In round 2, students take on the role of managers at Nestle who have to decide what the company should do next. This role play is about better understanding the impact of organisations on society in a dynamic context shaped by the unfolding positions and actions of a number of organisations. It involves comprehending organisations and their actions in a more systemic perspective than usual; seizing on the complexity and context dependent nature of sustainability. At the same time the case introduces the phenomenon of targeted social activism; and the question of change not only by an organisation but also at the field level. The case study can also be used to critically assess the value of a range of management concepts such as stakeholder theory and creating shared value as well as exploring the business contribution to sustainable development in developed and developing countries.
    • A 60 second clip to create change: palm oil role play (round 2)

      Roome (+), Nigel; Louche, Céline (2014)
      On March 17, 2010, Greenpeace launched a new campaign against the conversion of tropical rainforest to industrial palm oil plantations. The campaign directly attacked Nestle because its supply-chain included palm oil from alleged unsustainable sources. The campaign began with a 60 second video clip. Although Nestle was directly targeted by the campaign, other actors such as companies in the same sector, the suppliers and marketers of palm oil, and NGOs protecting the rainforest were also affected. The video went viral within a few days and Greenpeace followed up with other actions. The case is set up as a role play in two rounds. In round 1, students are invited to consider how the Greenpeace campaign might affect each of a set of five actors (but not Nestle). The five actors present their responses to the campaign and this provides a context to round 2. In round 2, students take on the role of managers at Nestle who have to decide what the company should do next. This role play is about better understanding the impact of organisations on society in a dynamic context shaped by the unfolding positions and actions of a number of organisations. It involves comprehending organisations and their actions in a more systemic perspective than usual; seizing on the complexity and context dependent nature of sustainability. At the same time the case introduces the phenomenon of targeted social activism; and the question of change not only by an organisation but also at the field level. The case study can also be used to critically assess the value of a range of management concepts such as stakeholder theory and creating shared value as well as exploring the business contribution to sustainable development in developed and developing countries.
    • A cybernetic model of corporate responsibility - sensing changes in business and society

      Roome (+), Nigel (International Journal of Technology Management, 2012)
      Further, sale attitudes are positively related to whether entrepreneurs perceive firm continuation
    • Beyond financial performance

      Roome (+), Nigel; Louche, Céline (2012)
    • Conceptualizing responsible innovation in craft villages in Vietnam

      Voeten, Jaap; Roome (+), Nigel; Thi Huong, Nguyen; de Groot, Gerard; de Haan, Job (2014)
    • Corporate Responsibility and the Business Schools' Response to the Credit Crisis

      Roome (+), Nigel; Bevan, David; Lenssen, Gilbert (2011)
      We analyze the post-acquisition performance of 384 unquoted entrepreneurial firms that have been acquired between 2000 and 2004, and compare it with 875 comparable, but independent entrepreneurial firms. Target firms in domestic acquisitions are less profitably and grow less than independent firms, both before and after the acquisition. Target firms in cross-border acquisitions are comparable to independent firms in growth and profitability, but they have higher margins and higher returns after the acquisition. Hence, especially cross-border acquisitions create operational synergies.
    • Flourishing: a frank conversation about sustainability

      Roome (+), Nigel (Journal of Industrial Ecology, 2015)
    • Globalization and sustainable development: some heresies from the past with relevance for today

      Roome (+), Nigel (2012)
      This paper (in German) is an introduction into the topic of CSR from a German perspective. It provides a brief overview and introduces the different chapters in an edited volume which is a Festschrift for Professor Dr. Gerd Rainer Wagner's 65th Birthday.
    • Impact measurement and performance analysis of CSR - IMPACT

      Roome (+), Nigel; Barth, Regine (2011)
      In many inventory settings companies wish to provide customer-differentiated service levels. These may, for example, be motivated by differences in the perceived customer lifetime value or by specific contractual agreements. One approach to provide differentiated service levels is to reserve some portion of the available inventory exclusively for specific customer classes. Existing approaches to inventory reservation are typically based on the assumption that a company can assign a customer specific revenue or penalty cost to any order or unit of demand filled or unfulfilled. In practice, however, it is usually extremely difficult to accurately estimate (especially long term) monetary implications of meeting or not meeting customer demand and corresponding service level requirements. The research presented in this paper addresses the problem of setting appropriate inventory reservations for different customer classes based on fill rate-based performance measures. We model a single period inventory reservation problem with two customer classes and nesting. We develop exact expressions for two conflicting performance measures: (1) the expected fill rate of high priority customers and (2) the expected loss in the system fill rate induced by inventory reservation. With these expressions a decision maker can analyze the tradeoff between the loss in overall system performance and the higher expected fill rates for prioritized customers. We provide analytical insights into the effects of nesting and the impact of relevant problem parameters on these two performance measures. The analytical insights are illustrated and highlighted through a set of numerical examples. Although we limit our analysis to a single period inventory reservation problem, we expect that our results can be utilized in a wide range of problem settings in which a decision maker has to ration a perishable resource among different classes of customers.
    • Journey toward business models for sustainability

      Roome (+), Nigel; Louche, Céline (Organization & Environment, 2016)
      Scholars increasingly recognise that business contributions to sustainable development are