• Insights into personal ICT use: Understanding continuance and discontinuance of wearable self-tracking devices

      Buchwald, Arne; Letner, Albert; Urbach, Nils; von Entreß-Fürsteneck, Matthias (2018)
      Wearable self-tracking devices become increasingly common in our society and reflect the trend towards the digitized individual. However, little is known what drives the continuance and dis-continuance usage of such devices. To empirically analyze factors leading to continuance and discontinuance of wearable self-tracking device usage, we develop a conceptual model based on established post-adoption concepts and the dual-factor theory. We validate it by applying structural equation modeling on collected survey data among 357 self-tracking users. Whereas previous research focuses on predicting continuance intentions, our results reveal discontinu-ance to be another decisive determinant of usage behavior. Additionally, we provide insights into factors driving continuance and discontinuance intentions and derive practical implications for producers. Our results advance the theoretical discourse on IS post-adoption behavior in a personal ICT context.
    • Quantify-me: consumer acceptance of wearable self-tracking devices

      Pfeiffer, Jurij; von Entreß-Fürsteneck, Matthias; Urbach, Nils; Buchwald, Arne (2016)
      The usage of wearable self-tracking technology has recently emerged as a new big trend in lifestyle and personal optimization in terms of health, fitness and well-being. Currently, only little is known about why people plan or start using such devices. Thus, in our research project, we aim at answering the question of what drives the usage intention of wearable self-tracking technology. Therefore, based on established technology acceptance theories, we deductively develop an acceptance model for wearable self-tracking technologies which sheds light on the pre-adoption criteria of such devices. We validate our proposed model by means of structural equation modeling using empirical data collected in a survey among 206 potential users. Our study identifies perceived usefulness, perceived enjoyment, social influ-ence, trust, personal innovativeness, and perceived support of well-being as the strongest drivers for the intention to use wearable self-tracking technologies. By accounting for the influence of the demographic factors age and gender, we provide a further refined picture.
    • Towards explaining the use of self-tracking devices: conceptual development of a continuance and discontinuance model

      Buchwald, Arne; Letner, Albert; Urbach, Nils; von Entreß-Fürsteneck, Matthias (2015)
      Users of digital self-tracking devices benefit from information about themselves. Thereby, the explanatory power of this information heavily depends on post-adoption continued usage of these devices. Thus, the aim of our research is to empirically analyze the factors that lead to continuous use of self-tracking devices. So far, research has largely focused on phases until IS adoption in a work environment and little on postadoption use in a consumer context which centers on either continuance or discontinuance. To advance research in this area, we develop a conceptual model that combines both in one comprehensive model by building on established post-adoption theories. We will continue our research with a quantitative-empirical evaluation of the developed model. With our research, we aim at contributing to both a better theoretical understanding in the field of IS post-adoption in a consumer context and giving practical implications for producers of self-tracking devices.
    • Towards explaining the willingness to disclose personal self-tracking data to service providers

      Buchwald, Arne; Letner, Albert; Urbach, Nils; von Entreß-Fürsteneck, Matthias (2017)
      Users of digital self-tracking devices increasingly benefit from multiple services related to their self-tracking data. Simultaneously, service providers are dependent from these data to offer such services. Thereby, the willingness of users to provide such personal data heavily depends on benefits and risks associated with the disclosure. In this regard, the aim of our research is to investigate the factors influencing the willingness to disclose personal self-tracking data to service providers. So far, IS re-search has largely focused on private information disclosure in social media and little in the health and behavior context. To advance research in this area, we develop a conceptual model based on the privacy calculus by building on established information disclosure and privacy theories. With our re-search, we aim at contributing to both a better theoretical understanding in the fields of privacy and information disclosure and giving practical implications for service provider.
    • Will I or will I not? Explaining the willingness to disclose personal self-tracking data to a health insurance company

      von Entreß-Fürsteneck, Matthias; Buchwald, Arne; Urbach, Nils (2019)
      Users of digital self-tracking devices increasingly benefit from multiple services related to their self-tracking data. Vice versa, new digital as well as “offline” service providers, such as health insurance companies, depend on the users’ willingness to disclose personal data to be able to offer new services. Whereas previous research mostly investigated the willingness to disclose data in the context of social media, e-commerce and smartphone apps, the aim of our research is to analyze the influence of the privacy calculus of personal risks and benefits on the willingness to disclose highly personal and confidential self-tracking data to health insurance companies. To do so, we develop a conceptual model based on the privacy calculus concept and validate it with a sample of 103 respondents in a scenario-based experiment using structural equation modeling. Our results reveal that privacy risks always have a negative impact on the willingness to disclose personal data, while positive effects of privacy benefits are partly depending on the data sensitivity.