• A 60 second clip to create change: palm oil role play (round 1)

      Roome (+), Nigel; Louche, Céline (2014)
      On March 17, 2010, Greenpeace launched a new campaign against the conversion of tropical rainforest to industrial palm oil plantations. The campaign directly attacked Nestle because its supply-chain included palm oil from alleged unsustainable sources. The campaign began with a 60 second video clip. Although Nestle was directly targeted by the campaign, other actors such as companies in the same sector, the suppliers and marketers of palm oil, and NGOs protecting the rainforest were also affected. The video went viral within a few days and Greenpeace followed up with other actions. The case is set up as a role play in two rounds. In round 1, students are invited to consider how the Greenpeace campaign might affect each of a set of five actors (but not Nestle). The five actors present their responses to the campaign and this provides a context to round 2. In round 2, students take on the role of managers at Nestle who have to decide what the company should do next. This role play is about better understanding the impact of organisations on society in a dynamic context shaped by the unfolding positions and actions of a number of organisations. It involves comprehending organisations and their actions in a more systemic perspective than usual; seizing on the complexity and context dependent nature of sustainability. At the same time the case introduces the phenomenon of targeted social activism; and the question of change not only by an organisation but also at the field level. The case study can also be used to critically assess the value of a range of management concepts such as stakeholder theory and creating shared value as well as exploring the business contribution to sustainable development in developed and developing countries.
    • A 60 second clip to create change: palm oil role play (round 2)

      Roome (+), Nigel; Louche, Céline (2014)
      On March 17, 2010, Greenpeace launched a new campaign against the conversion of tropical rainforest to industrial palm oil plantations. The campaign directly attacked Nestle because its supply-chain included palm oil from alleged unsustainable sources. The campaign began with a 60 second video clip. Although Nestle was directly targeted by the campaign, other actors such as companies in the same sector, the suppliers and marketers of palm oil, and NGOs protecting the rainforest were also affected. The video went viral within a few days and Greenpeace followed up with other actions. The case is set up as a role play in two rounds. In round 1, students are invited to consider how the Greenpeace campaign might affect each of a set of five actors (but not Nestle). The five actors present their responses to the campaign and this provides a context to round 2. In round 2, students take on the role of managers at Nestle who have to decide what the company should do next. This role play is about better understanding the impact of organisations on society in a dynamic context shaped by the unfolding positions and actions of a number of organisations. It involves comprehending organisations and their actions in a more systemic perspective than usual; seizing on the complexity and context dependent nature of sustainability. At the same time the case introduces the phenomenon of targeted social activism; and the question of change not only by an organisation but also at the field level. The case study can also be used to critically assess the value of a range of management concepts such as stakeholder theory and creating shared value as well as exploring the business contribution to sustainable development in developed and developing countries.
    • A better way to share the gains of collaborative shipping

      Boute, Robert; Van Steendam, Tom (Supply Chain Management Review, 2018)
      Collaborative shipping typically leads to cost savings. However, it's not always easy to determine each partner's contribution to the gains and to share them accordingly. An industry-oriented method has been tested in a set of pilots and promises to be fair, transparent and not overly complex.
    • A Bi-Population Based Genetic Algorithm for the Resource-Constrained Project Scheduling Problem

      Debels, Dieter; Vanhoucke, Mario (2005)
      The resource-constrained project scheduling problem (RCPSP) is one of the most challenging problems in project scheduling. During the last couple of years many heuristic procedures have been developed for this problem, but still these procedures often fail in finding near-optimal solutions for more challenging problem instances. In this paper, we present a new genetic algorithm (GA) that, in contrast of a conventional GA, makes use of two separate populations. This bi-population genetic algorithm (BPGA) operates on both a population of left-justified schedules and a population of right-justified schedules in order to fully exploit the features of the iterative forward/backward local search scheduling technique. Comparative computational results reveal that this procedure can be considered as today's best performing RCPSP heuristic.
    • A Bi-Population Based Genetic Algorithm for the Resource-Constrained Project Scheduling Problem

      Debels, Dieter; Vanhoucke, Mario (Lecture notes in Computer Science, 2005)
    • A buffer control method for top-down project control

      Martens, Annelies; Vanhoucke, Mario (European Journal of Operational Research, 2017)
      Timely completion of projects is an important factor for project success. However, projects often exceed their predefined deadline, which results in a late project delivery and an increase in the total project cost. In order to increase the probability of timely completion, a project buffer can be planned at the end of a project. During project execution, an assessment of the total buffer consumption at the project completion date can be made in order to periodically monitor the project progress. When the expected buffer consumption is higher than 100%, the project deadline is expected to be exceeded and the project manager should take corrective actions to get the project back on track. In this paper, a new buffer monitoring approach is introduced, which sets tolerance limits for Earned Value Management/Earned Schedule (EVM/ES) schedule performance metrics by allocating the project buffer over the different project phases. The purpose of these tolerance limits is to provide the project manager with accurate and reliable information on the expected project outcome during the project execution. A computational study is carried out to assess the performance of the proposed approach and to compare its performance with traditional buffer consumption monitoring procedures. Additionally, existing performance metrics for tolerance limits have been put into a hypothesis testing framework, and new metrics have been developed in order to fill the detected gaps in performance measurement. Results have shown that the proposed tolerance limits improve the performance of the monitoring phase, especially for parallel projects. Consequently, the underperformance of EVM/ES for parallel projects is mitigated by these limits.
    • A capability-based approach for selecting business meeting modes

      Standaert, Willem; Muylle, Steve; Basu, Amit (2015)
    • A case of using formal concept analysis in combination with emergent self organizing maps for detecting domestic violence

      Poelmans, Jonas; Elzinga, Paul; Viaene, Stijn; Dedene, Guido (+) (Lecture notes in Computer Science, 2009)
      This paper examines incremental financing decisions within high-growth businesses. A large longitudinal dataset, free of survivorship bias, to cover financing events of high-growth businesses for up to 8 years is analyzed. The empirical evidence shows that profitable businesses prefer to finance investments with retained earnings, even if they have unused debt capacity. External equity is particularly important for unprofitable businesses with high debt levels, limited cash flows, high risk of failure or significant investments in intangible assets. These findings are consistent with the extended pecking order theory controlling for constraints imposed by debt capacity. It suggests that new equity issues are particularly important to allow high-growth businesses to grow beyond their debt capacity.
    • A case study of applying boosting naive Bayes to claim fraud diagnosis

      Viaene, Stijn; Derrig, Richard A.; Dedene, Guido (+) (IEEE transactions on knowledge and data engineering, 2004)
    • A case study of Arteconomy - Building a bridge between art and enterprise: Flemish businesses stimulate creativity and innovation through art

      Van den Broeck, Herman; Cools, Eva; Maenhout, Tine (2008)
      In a world where there has long since been more at play than functionality and cost price, we need creative innovation more than ever before. Organisations are trying to find ways to embed more creativity, more innovative potential and more entrepreneurship into the everyday running of their businesses. They are constantly in search of effective ways to make their organisation's culture better equipped for change. The Flemish non-profit organisation Arteconomy has developed a method for doing this, by bringing businesspeople and artists together in a series of particularly unique projects. In this case study, you can read about the philosophy that give rise to Arteconomy and the pioneering work that preceded it. The case describes two specific projects that provide a concrete illustration of the arteconomy approach in two Belgian textile firms: 'The Dragon of Deerlijk' at Promo Fashion and 'The Walk' at Concordia Textiles. The case study, and more specifically Arteconomy's approach, provides relevant material for discussion with students (level: Masters and MBA) and managers (in the context of executive business programmes) on: (1) change as an organisational process, and (2) how to stimulate employees' creative skills.
    • A chance to overcome religious divisions

      Lal, Rollie (The San Diego Union-Tribune, 2004)
    • A classification of development programmes and its consequences for programme management

      Vereecke, Ann; Pandelaere, Els; Deschoolmeester, Dirk; Stevens, Marleen (International Journal of Operations and Production Management, 2003)
    • A classification of programmes and its managerial impact

      Vereecke, Ann; Stevens, Marleen; Pandelaere, Els; Deschoolmeester, Dirk (2003)
      The paper describes the results of an exploratory research study on the application of programme management in six companies. A classification of programmes is developed that may help in understanding the differences between programmes and the managerial impact of these differences. The research shows that the formalised and rigorous approach as described in most programme management handbooks is not widely adopted. The cases show less centralisation, less formalisation and less management of the interdependencies between the projects in the programme than one would expect on the basis of the programme management literature. This is especially the case in programmes that originate as a grouping of a set of existing projects. Yet, formalisation is mentioned as the main success factor in managing programmes. Keywords: Programme management, project management, management of change
    • A classification scheme for operating room planning and scheduling problems

      Cardoen, Brecht; Demeulemeester, Erik; Beliën, Jeroen (2009)