• From group disparity to group emotions: Theoretical underpinnings

      Boros, Smaranda; Curseu, Petru L .; Meslec, M.N (2009)
      By combining insights from relational network theory and agency theory we identify the boundary conditions to the embeddedness approach to partner selection decisions in interfirm collaborations. Employing a longitudinal dataset comprising the investment syndicates for the population of UK management buyouts between 1993 and 2003, we find that relational embeddedness is less important for selecting partners when agency risks are low, allowing firms to expand their networks. Furthermore, reputational capital may act as a partial substitute for relational embeddedness, again permitting firms to expand their networks. Our findings enhance understanding of the boundary conditions associated with the relational network approach to partner selections and network behaviour.
    • From manager to strategist: An examination of the evolving role of persistent high-growth entrepreneurs

      Dillen, Yannick; Laveren, Eddy; Martens, Rudy; De Vocht, Sven; Van Imschoot, Eric (International Journal of Entrepreneurial Behavior & Research, 2019)
      Few high-growth firms (HGFs) are able to maintain high-growth over time. The purpose of this paper is to find out why only a small number of firms become persistent HGFs, explicitly focusing on the role of the founding entrepreneur in this process.
    • From me to we or from we to me? Tensions of social identity and change across cultures

      Boros, Smaranda (2020)
      The main theme of the conference is “The challenges of working with diversity in social systems”. With the general demographic trends and the challenges raised by the multiple (simultaneous) transitions faced by society today, diversity is a key topic on the research agendas in Social Sciences. We strive to harness the benefits of diversity in solving difficult societal and environmental issues and at the same time we try to find solutions to the problems associated with diversity (e.g., conflict, marginalization, exclusion).
    • From offshoring to globalization of human capital

      Lewin, Arie Y.; Peeters, Carine (2006)
    • From offshoring to globalization of human capital

      Lewin, Arie Y.; Massini, Silvia; Peeters, Carine (2007)
    • From offshoring to globalization of human capital and innovation

      Lewin, Arie Y.; Massini, Silvia; Peeters, Carine (2007)
    • From one-class to two-class classification by incorporating expert knowledge

      Oosterlinck, Dieter; Benoit, Dries F.; Baecke, Philippe (2018)
      In certain business cases the aim is to identify observations that deviate from an identified normal behaviour. It is often the case that only instances of the normal class are known, whereas so called novelties are undiscovered. Novelty detection or anomaly detection approaches usually apply methods from the field of outlier detection. However, anomalies are not always outliers and outliers are not always anomalies. The standard one-class classification approaches therefore underperform in many real business cases. Drawing upon literature about incorporating expert knowledge,we come up with a new method that significantly improves the predictive performance of a one-class model. Combining the available data and expert knowledge about potential anomalies enables us to create synthetic novelties. The latter are incorporated into a standard two-class predictive model. Based on a telco dataset, we prove that our synthetic two-class model clearly outperforms a standard one-class model on the synthetic dataset. In a next step the model was applied to real data. Top identified novelties were manually checked by experts. The results indicate that incorporating expert knowledge to transform a one-class problem into a two-class problem is a valuable method.
    • From one-class to two-class classification by incorporating expert knowledge: Novelty detection in human behaviour

      Oosterlinck, Dries; Benoit, Dries F.; Baecke, Philippe (European Journal of Operational Research, 2020)
      One-class classification is the standard procedure for novelty detection. Novelty detection aims to identify observations that deviate from a determined normal behaviour. Only instances of one class are known, whereas so called novelties are unlabelled. Traditional novelty detection applies methods from the field of outlier detection. These standard one-class classification approaches have limited performance in many real business cases. The traditional techniques are mainly developed for industrial problems such as machine condition monitoring. When applying these to human behaviour, the performance drops significantly. This paper proposes a method that improves existing approaches by creating semi-synthetic novelties in order to have labelled data for the two classes. Expert knowledge is incorporated in the initial phase of this data generation process. The method was deployed on a real-life test case where the goal was to detect fraudulent subscriptions to a telecom family plan. This research demonstrates that the two-class expert model outperforms a one-class model on the semi-synthetic dataset. In a next step the model was validated on a real dataset. A fraud detection team of the company manually checked the top predicted novelties. The results show that incorporating expert knowledge to transform a one-class problem into a two-class problem is a valuable method.
    • From phonebloks to google project ara. A case study of the application of sustainable mass customization

      Hankammer, Stephan; Jiang, Ruth; Kleer, Robin (2016)
      Mass Customization (MC) has become a major trend in the consumer goods market in recent years. However, it is still unclear if MC goods have a positive impact on the environment due to the many influencing factors in comparison to mass produced goods. With Google’s “Project Ara”, a modular and customizable smartphone approach is very likely to reach market maturity and its economic, social and ecologic impacts are still unclear. Using a qualitative case study approach, we shed light on its potential economic success. Furthermore, we use the two theoretical concepts of Eco Innovation (EI) and Systemic Innovation (SI) to assess Google Ara’s potential to lead to changes in terms of ecologic and social concerns. In our analysis, we show that Project Ara has the potential to outperform its competitors of modular smartphones. We work out that Google’s modular approach could lead to a longer useful life of smartphones – or at least for some components. Finally, we affirm Project Ara’s general potential for being an SI. Even though Project Ara will very likely not change the complete smartphone market and the behavior of the involved actors, there is a potential for influencing sociocultural behavior in the long tail of the smartphone market.
    • From pitch to Q&A: Why do angel investors change their minds?

      Imhof, Zoë; Collewaert, Veroniek (2018)
      Drawing on the elaboration likelihood model, this paper develops and tests a set of hypotheses concerning why business angels change their intentions to invest moving from pitch to Q&A. We test our hypotheses using a sample of 654 real-life angel evaluations of entrepreneurs pitching for money. Our results suggest a change in intentions to invest is less likely to occur when the entrepreneur has a more attractive voice, higher levels of displayed passion and higher levels of perceived coachability. Angels are more likely to change their minds though when they perceive the entrepreneur to be more trustworthy.
    • From pitch to Q&A: Why do business angels change their minds?

      Imhof, Zoë; Collewaert, Veroniek (2018)
      Drawing on the elaboration likelihood model, this paper develops and tests a set of hypotheses concerning why business angels change their intentions to invest moving from pitch to Q&A. We test our hypotheses using a sample of 654 real-life angel evaluations of entrepreneurs pitching for money. Our results suggest a change in intentions to invest is less likely to occur when the entrepreneur has a more attractive voice, higher levels of displayed passion and higher levels of perceived coachability. Angels are more likely to change their minds though when they perceive the entrepreneur to be more trustworthy.
    • From pitch to Q&A: Why do business angels change their minds?

      Imhof, Zoë; Collewaert, Veroniek (2018)
      Drawing on the elaboration likelihood model, this paper develops and tests a set of hypotheses concerning why business angels change their intentions to invest moving from pitch to Q&A. We test our hypotheses using a sample of 654 real-life angel evaluations of entrepreneurs pitching for money. Our results suggest a change in intentions to invest is less likely to occur when the entrepreneur has a more attractive voice, higher levels of displayed passion and higher levels of perceived coachability. Angels are more likely to change their minds though when they perceive the entrepreneur to be more trustworthy.
    • From pitch to Q&A: Why do business angels change their minds?

      Imhof, Zoë; Collewaert, Veroniek (2018)
      Drawing on the elaboration likelihood model, this paper develops and tests a set of hypotheses concerning why business angels change their intentions to invest moving from pitch to Q&A. We test our hypotheses using a sample of 654 real-life angel evaluations of entrepreneurs pitching for money. Our results suggest a change in intentions to invest is less likely to occur when the entrepreneur has a more attractive voice, higher levels of displayed passion and higher levels of perceived coachability. Angels are more likely to change their minds though when they perceive the entrepreneur to be more trustworthy.