• Frontiers of Entrepreneurship Research 1998

      Reynolds, Paul D.; Bygrave, William D.; Carter, N.M.; Manigart, Sophie; Mason, Colin; Meyer, G.D.; Shaver, K.G. (1998)
    • Frontiers of Entrepreneurship Research 2000

      Reynolds, Paul D.; Autio, E.; Bygrave, William D.; Manigart, Sophie; Meyer, G.D.; Sapienza, Harry J.; Shaver, K.G. (2000)
    • Further validation of the Cognitive Style Indicator (CoSI)

      Cools, Eva; Vanderheyden, Karlien (2013)
      In this paper we compare the usability of ESOM and MDS as text exploration instruments in police investigations. We combine them with traditional classification instruments such as the SVM and Naïve Bayes. We perform a case of real-life data mining using a dataset consisting of police reports describing a wide range of violent incidents that occurred during the year 2007 in the Amsterdam-Amstelland police region (The Netherlands). We compare the possibilities offered by the ESOM and MDS for iteratively enriching our feature set, discovering confusing situations, faulty case labelings and significantly improving the classification accuracy. The results of our research are currently operational in the Amsterdam-Amstelland police region for upgrading the employed domestic violence definition, for improving the training of police officers and for developing a highly accurate and comprehensible case triage model.
    • Fusies in het hoger onderwijs, of hoe verschillend top en basis kunnen denken

      Devos, Geert; Verhoeven, Jef C. (Personeel en organisatie, 2003)
    • Future challenges for human resource development professionals in European learning-oriented organisations

      Buyens, Dirk; Wouters, Karen; Dewettinck, Koen (2003)
      Within the scope of the TSER-project (1998-2000) which aimed to examine new HRD initiatives in learning-oriented organisations throughout Europe, this paper presents the general findings and some country specific differences for Belgium. The study aimed to answer the following questions: How do HRD departments in learning-oriented organisations envision their new role in stimulating and supporting employees to learn continuously? What strategies do HRD departments adopt to realise their envisioned role? What inhibiting factors do they encounter when trying to realise their new role? A survey held among a group of 165 companies, 39 of which are located in Belgium, made clear that the Belgian HRD professionals do not position themselves on the first place as strategic partners in realising the business. Also the results concerning the strategies do not disclose a picture of highly innovative HRD practices. However, the professionals indicate that strategies to support the business and to stimulate learning and knowledge sharing will become increasingly important strategies for the future. The factors that appear to hinder the change process most strongly, are a lack of time on behalf of the employees and managers, a lack of clarity on HRD's role, insufficient learning culture and low flexibility of the organisational structure.
    • Future house of rewards - Reward systems in an era of longevity

      Baeten, Xavier; Loyens, Said; De Greve, Bert (2018)
      This white paper by Prof Xavier Baeten, Said Loyens (Vlerick’s Centre for Excellence in Strategic Rewards) and Bert De Greve (Hudson) proposes concrete and evidence-based ideas on how Belgian firms should manage wage setting in the future.
    • The future of DSOs. Our take on energy communities and regulatory sandboxes

      Broeckx, Saskia; Hadush, Samson Yemane; Ramos, Ariana; Meeus, Leonardo (2019)
      The energy transition is changing the energy ecosystem. Until recently, energy production was mostly centralised, with relatively few large power plants connected to the transmission system operated by transmission system operators (TSOs). Regulatory changes to accommodate the integration of renewable energy initially focused on the transmission aspect, which resulted in a significant transformation of the TSOs, while leaving the distribution system operator (DSO) landscape virtually unaffected. In recent years, however, due in part to advances in renewable energy technology, power generation and distribution have become more decentralised. DSOs now find themselves at the centre of change, operating the grid which all these new players – producers and prosumers – want to connect to and use. The challenge is for DSOs to enable and facilitate change, rather than becoming a bottleneck. In 2018 the DSO Chair organised two workshops to discuss topical issues facing the future of DSOs: (1) energy communities and (2) regulatory sandboxes. Despite being selected independently of each other, these two topics turned out to be interrelated.
    • The future of EU electricity network codes

      Meeus, Leonardo; Nouicer, Athir; Reif, Valerie; Schittekatte, Tim (2020)
      This comprehensive book on the European energy transition has been written by more than 40 European leading energy- and climate experts. It reflects on the latest policy developments, as such as the Clean Energy for All Europeans Package, the Green Deal and the Climate Law.
    • The future of internal staffing: A vision for transformational e-HRM

      Rogiers, Philip; Viaene, Stijn; Leysen, Jan (2020)
      Through an international Delphi study, this article explores the new dynamics that are starting to characterize internal staffing, by means of transformational electronic human resource management. Our focus is on three types of information systems that are expected to evolve and be used in function of transformative change in internal staffing systems: human resource management systems, job portals, and talent marketplaces. Together, these systems challenge current knowledge on internal labor market organization, by affording market-like staffing systems that enable employees to construct personalized and self-directed pathways for growth. Further, this article identifies the key challenges for realizing this vision in governments, such as inadequate regulations and funding priorities, a lack of leadership and strategic vision, together with rigid work policies and practices and a change-resistant culture. Tied to the vision in this article, we identify several areas of future inquiry that bridge the divide between theory and practice."
    • The future of renewable gases. Our take on the role of renewable gases in the energy transition

      Broeckx, Saskia; Roach, Martin; Meeus, Leonardo (2021)
      The European Green Deal aims to make Europe climate-neutral by 2050. This vision of a net-zero carbon future has prompted the European Commission to up its emission reduction target: by 2030, greenhouse gases should be cut by at least 55% compared to 1990. This target was approved by the European Council in December 2020 but is still to be translated into European legislation. Meeting this target requires decarbonisation of all carbon-intensive energy consumption sectors, i.e. industry, buildings and transport. Quite understandably, the gas sector is concerned about its future. Natural gas is, after all, a carbon-based energy source, which, in the absence of carbon capture and storage, contributes significantly to greenhouse gas emissions. Initially, many thought the energy transition would be an all-electric one. Those who still think so are now in the minority. Electrification is not always feasible, technically or economically. In some cases, full decarbonisation will require the use of alternative clean energy carriers, such as renewable and low-carbon gases, like hydrogen and biomethane. The EU’s Renewable Energy Directive, along with other legislation, is currently being reviewed to update it in line with the new 2030 emission reduction target. This Directive already includes targets for electricity generation from renewable sources, so it is expected that similar targets will be set for renewable gases. Given that technology and infrastructure investments have a lifetime of typically 20 to 60 years, the gas sector has no time to lose. This is why the Fluxys Chair was founded in January 2018. Fluxys is the independent transmission system operator that owns and operates Belgium’s high-pressure natural gas transmission grid, its natural gas storage infrastructure and the liquefied natural gas terminal in Zeebrugge. Through academic research by Professor Leonardo Meeus and doctoral researcher Martin Roach with the Vlerick Energy Centre, the company is seeking to anticipate any upcoming Belgian and EU legislation in order to make informed investment decisions. How can the existing natural gas infrastructure be repurposed for the transport of decarbonised gases? How can we harness the full potential and opportunities of renewable gases? What context is needed to decarbonise the gas sector so that it can play a role in the future integrated energy system? Two years on, it is time to take stock of what we know and what we do not yet know. The white paper ‘The future of renewable gases’ outlines the context of our research, as well as providing background information.
    • Future time perspective and small business growth in developing regions

      Vermeire, Jacob; Meuleman, Miguel; Lens, W. (2014)
    • Future-proof tariff design: Recovering sunk grid costs in a world where consumers are pushing back

      Schittekatte, Tim; Momber, Ilan; Meeus, Leonardo (2017)
      Traditional analysis of distribution grid user’s reaction to tariffs assumes a low price sensitivity and a lack of alternative technologies to grid connection. This is radically changing with two technology breakthroughs: (1) Photovoltaics (PV) enable domestic and commercial consumers to self-produce energy; (2) Batteries allow self-producers to set both their grid energy and capacity parameters. Contributing to the state of the art, the grid cost recovery problem is modelled as a non-cooperative game between consumers. In this game, the availability and costs of new technologies (such as PV and batteries) strategically interact with tariff structures. Four states of the world for user’s access to new technologies are distinguished and three tariff structures are evaluated. The assessed distribution network tariff structures are: energy volumetric charges with net-metering, energy volumetric charges for both injection and withdrawal, and capacity-based charges. Results show that the new distribution world -open by new technology choices for grid users- is highly interactive and threatens grid regulation not understanding it.
    • Future-proof tariff design: Recovering sunk grid costs in a world where consumers are pushing back

      Schittekatte, Tim; Momber, Ilan; Meeus, Leonardo (Energy Economics, 2018)
      Traditional analysis of distribution network tariff design assumes a lack of alternatives to grid connection for the fulfilment of consumers' electricity needs. This is radically changing with breakthroughs in two technologies: (1) Photovoltaics (PV) enable domestic and commercial consumers to self-produce energy; (2) Batteries allow consumers and self-producers to gain control over their grid energy and capacity parameters. Contributing to the state of the art, the grid cost recovery problem for the Distribution System Operator (DSO) is modelled as a non-cooperative game between consumers. In this game, the availability and costs of the two named technologies strategically interact with tariff structures. Four states of the world for user's access to technologies are distinguished and three tariff structures are evaluated. The assessed distribution network tariff structures are: energy volumetric charges with net-metering, energy volumetric charges for both injection and withdrawal, and capacity-based charges. Results show that in a state of the world with new technology choices for grid users both efficiency and equity issues can arise when distribution network charges are ill-designed.