• Is een sterk merk ook sterk in werk?

      De Vos, Ans; Velghe, Dirk (2003)
    • Is gender stereotyping in advertising more prevalent in masculine countries? A cross-national analysis

      De Wulf, Kristof; Odekerken-Schröder, Gaby; Hofstee, Natascha (2003)
      The objective of this study is to test whether gender stereotyping in printed advertising is more prevalent in masculine as opposed to feminine countries. We consider this to be important, as advertising is generally more influential than literature in spreading stereotypical ideas given its high accessibility. Moreover, the way in which sexes are portrayed in advertising affects people's perceptions of gender roles in real life. Using content analysis, we collected empirical data on gender stereotyping of women depicted in 946 printed advertisements from two European countries widely differing in their level of masculinity, the UK and the Netherlands. The results indicate that a country's masculinity index is hardly related to the use of gender stereotyping in printed advertising, potentially implying that other factors underlie the use of gender stereotyping. Key words: Gender stereotyping, UK and the Netherlands, advertising, content analysis, masculinity index
    • Is Gender Stereotyping More Prevalent in Masculine Countries? A Cross-National Analysis

      Odekerken-Schröder, Gaby; De Wulf, Kristof; Hofstee, Natascha (International Marketing Review, 2002)
      The objective of this study is to test whether gender stereotyping in printed advertising is more prevalent in masculine as opposed to feminine countries. This is considered important, as advertising is generally more influential than literature in spreading stereotypical ideas, given its high accessibility. Moreover, the way in which sexes are portrayed in advertising affects people's perceptions of gender roles in real life. Using content analysis, we collected empirical data on gender stereotyping of women depicted in 946 printed advertisements from two European countries widely differing in their level of masculinity - the UK and the Netherlands. The results indicate that a country's masculinity index is hardly related to the use of gender stereotyping in printed advertising, potentially implying that other factors underlie the use of gender stereotyping.
    • Is it here where I belong? An integrative model of turnover intentions

      Boros, Smaranda; Curseu, Petru L . (Journal of Applied Social Psychology, 2013)
      We test a mediated moderation model in which the influence of organizational prestige and permeability on turnover intentions is mediated by organizational commitment and identification. We test this model in a 2 × 2 design in four Romanian organizations. Results support a partial mediation of identification between the considered organizational antecedents, and their interaction upon affective and continuance commitment, and a full mediation of commitment between identification and turnover intentions. Permeability moderates the impact of prestige upon identification and commitment. Finally, we draw conclusions about the mind‐sets behind identification, affective, and continuance commitment, and propose implications for future research and practitioners.
    • Is small still beautiful?

      Van den Berghe, Lutgart (1996)
    • Is the prevailing wholesale market design in Europe and North America comparable?

      Meeus, Leonardo; Belmans, Ronnie (2007)
      Confirmatory factor analyses within each sample showed the best fit to the data for a threefactor model underlying the CoSI. Measurement invariance tests, using multigroup confirmatory factor analysis, indicated that the relationships among the scale items were equivalent across cultures. Finally, in addition to traditional measurement equivalence tests, a nomological net has been investigated. A comparison of the correlations between cognitive styles and personality yielded partial measurement equivalence, with no significant differences between the two samples for 11 out of the 15 correlations. Overall, the study supports the cross-cultural validity of the CoSI, although further research in other international samples is particularly needed to strengthen these results.
    • Is there a future role for HRM?

      De Vos, Ans; Buyens, Dirk (1997)
    • Is venture capital socially responsible? Exploring the imprinting effect of VC funding on CSR practices

      Alakent, Ekin; Goktan, Sinan M.; Khoury, Theodore Andrew (Journal of Business Venturing, 2020)
      We study how corporate social responsibility (CSR) is guided by ownership history, specifically whether a company receives venture capital (VC) funding or not. We argue that companies that receive VC funding are less likely to adopt CSR practices due to unique VC imprinting and that temporal and investment orientation moderate this relationship. We find that VC-backed companies have poorer CSR records, which do improve over time, but at a comparatively slower rate than non-VC-backed companies. However, when VC-backed companies receive funding from VC firms that have a responsible investment orientation and a broader stakeholder view, their CSR records are significantly better. This study contributes to our understanding of imprinting boundaries and related repercussions in stakeholder management strategies.
    • The issues that shape strategy

      Meeus, Leonardo (2020)
      Companies do not only compete in markets; they also compete on social and political issues. Depending on the business opportunities or threats they identify related to an issue, companies will behave as veterans that defend the status quo in an industry, as reformers that will work with the authorities to change the rules of the game, or as heroes that help solve an issue. In this article, we identify the typical elements of success for each of these three generic nonmarket strategies. We do this based on a framework that focuses on the framing of issues, the alliances that can be mobilized around an issue, and the arenas that can be used to make a move.
    • The issues that shape strategy

      Meeus, Leonardo (The European Business Review, 2021)
      Companies do not only compete in markets; they also compete on social and political issues. Depending on the business opportunities or threats they identify related to an issue, companies will behave as veterans that defend the status quo in an industry, as reformers that will work with the authorities to change the rules of the game, or as heroes that help solve an issue. In this article, we identify the typical elements of success for each of these three generic nonmarket strategies. We do this based on a framework that focuses on the framing of issues, the alliances that can be mobilized around an issue, and the arenas that can be used to make a move.
    • IT and SMEs: Literature overview

      Devos, Jan; Van Landeghem, Hendrik; Deschoolmeester, Dirk (2009)
    • IT enabled change: the TPI project at Philips

      De Graaf, Anouk; Vanhaverbeke, Wim (2001)