• Why are companies offshoring innovation? The emerging global race for talent

      Lewin, Arie Y.; Massini, Silvia; Peeters, Carine (2008)
    • Why are companies offshoring innovation? The emerging global race for talent

      Lewin, Arie Y.; Massini, Silvia; Peeters, Carine (2008)
    • Why are companies offshoring innovation? The emerging global race for talent

      Lewin, Arie Y.; Massini, Silvia; Peeters, Carine (Journal of International Business Studies, 2009)
      This paper empirically studies determinants of decision by companies to offshore innovation activities. It uses survey data from the international Offshoring Research Network project to estimate the impact of managerial intentionality, past experience, and environmental factors on the probability of offshoring innovation projects. The results show that the emerging shortage of highly skilled science and engineering talent in the US and, more generally, the need to access qualified personnel are important explanatory factors for offshoring innovation decisions. Moreover, contrary to drivers of many other functions, labor arbitrage is less important than other forms of cost savings. The paper concludes with a discussion of the changing dynamics underlying offshoring of innovation activities, suggesting that companies are entering a global race for talent.
    • Why Business Schools keep neglecting project management competencies

      Nieto-Rodriguez, Antonio (PM World Journal, 2017)
      Digitalization, mergers & acquisitions, international expansion, business model redesign, new product launch, cultural transformation. All these strategic initiatives are common projects undertaken to stay alive in the current unpredictable markets. Today, to be successful, organizations require leaders with strong project management competencies. Yet, according to our research, only 4% of the Top 200 Business Schools in the world offer project management as part of their MBA core curriculums.
    • Why do European venture capital companies syndicate?

      Manigart, Sophie; Lockett, Andy; Meuleman, Miguel; Wright, Mike; Landström, Hans; Bruining, Hans; Desbrières, Philippe; Hommel, Ulrich (2002)
      Financial theory, resource-based theory and access to deal flow are used to explain syndication practices among European venture capital (VC) firms. The desire to share risk and increase portfolio diversification is a more important motive for syndication than the desire to access additional intangible resources or deal flow. Access to resources is, however, more important for non-lead than for lead investors. When resource-based motives are more important, the propensity to syndicate increases. Syndication intensity is higher for young VC firms and for VC firms, specialised in a specific investment stage. Finally, syndication strategies are similar across European countries, but differ from North American strategies.
    • Why it takes two to build successful buyer-seller relationships

      Odekerken-Schröder, Gaby; De Wulf, Kristof; Schumacher, P. (2000)
    • Why it takes two to build successful buyer-seller relationships

      De Wulf, Kristof; Odekerken-Schröder, Gaby; Schumacher, P. (2000)
    • Why managers don't always do the right thing when delivering bad news: The roles of empathy, self-esteem, and moral development in interactional fairness

      Patient, David; Skarlicki, Daniel (2005)
      Previous research shows that some managers do not deliver bad news in ways deemed interactionally fair (with dignity, respect, and adequate explanations). In this dissertation I explore whether specific individual characteristics predict the tendency to deliver bad news in ways regarded as interactionally (un) fair: the communicator's empathy, self-esteem, moral development, emotional intelligence, and moral identity.
    • Why sales reps should welcome information technology: Measuring the impact of CRM-based IT on sales effectiveness

      Ahearne, Michael; Hughes, D.; Schillewaert, Niels (International Journal of Research in Marketing, 2007)
    • Why seeking feedback from diverse sources may not be sufficient for stimulating creativity: The role of performance dynamism and creative time pressure

      Sijbom, R.B.L.; Anseel, Frederik; Crommelinck, Michiel; De Beuckelaer, Alain; De Stobbeleir, Katleen (Journal of Organizational Behavior, 2018)
      We explore how the impact of seeking feedback from different sources (i.e., feedback source variety) on employee creativity is shaped by perceptions of the work environment. Specifically, we argue that two contextual factors, namely, performance dynamism (Study 1) and creative time pressure (Study 2), moderate the relationship between feedback source variety and creativity such that under conditions of high performance dynamism and low creative time pressure, individuals benefit from diverse feedback information. In Study 1 (N = 1,031), the results showed that under conditions of high performance dynamism, the relationship between feedback source variety and self-reported creativity was nonlinear, with employee creativity exponentially increasing as a function of feedback source variety. Similarly, in Study 2 (N = 181), we found that under conditions of low creative time pressure, the relationship between feedback source variety and employee creativity was nonlinear, with supervisor-rated creative performance exponentially increasing at higher levels of feedback source variety. Such results highlight that the relationship between feedback source variety and creative performance is affected by the perceptions of the work environment in which feedback is sought.
    • Why some are more equal: Family firm heterogeneity and the effect on management’s attention to CSR

      Fehre, Kerstin; Weber, Florian (Business Ethics - A European Review, 2019)
      Research at the family firm–Corporate Social Responsibility (CSR) nexus lacks agreement about whether family firms are more or less socially responsible than their non‐family counterparts, which leads discussion relating to the bright and dark side of socioemotional wealth (SEW). We add to this ongoing debate in two different ways. First, we build on family firm heterogeneity and argue for a gray side to SEW, located between the bright and dark sides that is dependent upon the kind of family firm ownership. Second, we assume that prior research on a diverse set of CSR behaviors may, to some extent, explain the contradicting results; thus, we propose going back a step and focusing on management’s attention to CSR as an important antecedent of CSR behavior. By analyzing the letters to the shareholders of German HDAX firms from 2003 to 2012, this study finds that family ownership positively affects management’s attention to CSR, mainly driven by founders and family foundations. The research adds to our understanding of the family firm–CSR nexus by scrutinizing the role SEW plays in management’s attention to CSR when it comes to family firm heterogeneity.
    • Why start from scratch when you buy your own company? 10 frequent mistakes when buying a small business

      Meuleman, Miguel; Vanoorbeek, Hans (2018)
      Rather than start a new company from scratch, entrepreneurs often choose to buy a small business instead. But many people underestimate how complex and time consuming this process can be. Our white paper sets out ten frequent mistakes people make when buying a small business.
    • Wie zijn de goede bazen in slechte tijden?

      De Schamphelaere, Veroniek (HR Magazine, 2009)
    • Will I or will I not? Explaining the willingness to disclose personal self-tracking data to a health insurance company

      von Entreß-Fürsteneck, Matthias; Buchwald, Arne; Urbach, Nils (2019)
      Users of digital self-tracking devices increasingly benefit from multiple services related to their self-tracking data. Vice versa, new digital as well as “offline” service providers, such as health insurance companies, depend on the users’ willingness to disclose personal data to be able to offer new services. Whereas previous research mostly investigated the willingness to disclose data in the context of social media, e-commerce and smartphone apps, the aim of our research is to analyze the influence of the privacy calculus of personal risks and benefits on the willingness to disclose highly personal and confidential self-tracking data to health insurance companies. To do so, we develop a conceptual model based on the privacy calculus concept and validate it with a sample of 103 respondents in a scenario-based experiment using structural equation modeling. Our results reveal that privacy risks always have a negative impact on the willingness to disclose personal data, while positive effects of privacy benefits are partly depending on the data sensitivity.