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dc.contributor.authorBouckenooghe, Dave
dc.contributor.authorBuelens, Marc
dc.contributor.authorFontaine, J.
dc.contributor.authorVanderheyden, Karlien
dc.date.accessioned2017-12-02T14:17:11Z
dc.date.available2017-12-02T14:17:11Z
dc.date.issued2004
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/20.500.12127/1470
dc.description.abstractThe aim of this paper was to investigate the relationship between stress, values, and value conflict. Data collected from 400 people working in a wide variety of companies in Flanders indicated that the values openness to change, conservation, self-transcendence, self-enhancement, and value conflict were important predictors of stress. Participants open to change reported less stress, while respondents scoring high on conservation, self-enhancement, and self-transcendence perceived more stress. People reporting high value conflict also experienced more stress. Separate analyses for the male and female subsamples demonstrated that sex differences regarding the relationship between the four value types and stress cast new light on the findings for the total sample. The article concludes with a discussion of the results and future research directions.
dc.language.isoen
dc.publisherVlerick Business School
dc.subjectChange Management
dc.titleValues, value conflict and stress the prediction of stress by values and value conflict
refterms.dateFOA2019-10-14T14:27:09Z
dc.source.issue13
dc.source.numberofpages21
vlerick.knowledgedomainPeople Management & Leadership
vlerick.typecommWorking paper
vlerick.vlerickdepartmentP&O
dc.relation.urlhttp://public.vlerick.com/Publications/9beca2bd-69a9-e011-8a89-005056a635ed.pdf
dc.identifier.vperid68752
dc.identifier.vperid35841
dc.identifier.vperid140637
dc.identifier.vperid35909
dc.identifier.vpubid1601


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