• A decision support system for cyclic master surgery scheduling with multiple objectives

      Beliën, Jeroen; Demeulemeester, Erik; Cardoen, Brecht (2009)
    • A typology-based decisional framework to support market access and reimbursement decisions for personalised medicines

      Govaerts, Laurenz; Geldof, Tine; Simoens, Steven; Huys, Isabelle (Blackwell Pub., 2017)
      New co-development approaches in personalized medicine challenge current decisional frameworks of health-technology access and reimbursement procedures. We aim to conceptualize an efficient typology-based decisional framework which takes into account the development and market access synchronism between therapeutic (Tx) and diagnostic (Dx) components of personalized medicines.
    • Acute coronary syndrome: what is the cost-effectiveness of prevention, point-of-care technology and telemonitoring?

      Van Dyck, Walter; Gassull, Daniel; Vértes, Gergely; Jain, Prateek; Palaniappan, Muhilan; Schulthess, Duane; Tambuyzer, Erik; Hudson, Richard; Moran, Nuala (2012)
      This study is a cost-analysis that calculates the impact of three interventions for patients identified as ‘at risk’ for Acute Coronary Syndrome - a cardio-vascular exercise programme, point-of-care digital diagnostics, and telemonitoring adherence tools. The methodology utilizes a model of the annualized costs of ACS for the entire treatment value chain, and measures the impact of the three interventions by the change in treatment cost, incremental net benefit, and QALY. The results demonstrate that the largest impact is measured when all three interventions are utilized simultaneously producing a cumulative savings of €4424 and 0.126 QALY per patient. We also find a significant decrease in Emergency Room visits by 15% and changes in rates of utilization of Catharization (−59%), Angioplasty (−59%), Bypass (−17%), Medication (−14%) and Rehabilitation (−13%).
    • Barco implements platform-based product development in its healthcare division

      Boute, Robert; Van den Broeke, Maud; Deneire, Kristof (2018)
      In this article, we present how Barco, a global technology company, used an operations research optimization model, which was supported by an efficient solution method, to implement platforms—common structures from which sets of products could be made—for the design and production of its high-tech medical displays. Our optimization model captures all cost aspects related to the use of platforms, thus, it is an objective tool that considers the input from marketing, sales, research and development (R&D), operations, and the supply chain. This comprehensive view allowed Barco to avoid the excessive costs that may result from the implementation of an incorrect platform. Our model supported Barco in determining the elements that should comprise each platform, the number of platforms to develop, and the products to derive from each platform. The results of the project led to reductions in safety stock and increased flexibility due to the use of platforms: R&D can now introduce twice as many products using the same resources, thus increasing Barco's earnings by over 5 million euros annually and reducing product introduction time by nearly 50 percent.
    • Clusters in the biopharmaceutical industry: Toward a new method of analysis

      Erden, Zeynep; von Krogh, Georg (Elsevier, 2011)
      Clusters are groups of co-located and interconnected firms and institutions linked by commonalities in their strategies and complementarities in their activities and resources. There are several reasons for the geographical clustering of firms in the biopharmaceutical industry. This review unpacks some advantages and disadvantages of cluster participation, and proposes a new method to enable managers and researchers to identify clusters in the biopharmaceutical industry.
    • Comparative and combined effectiveness of innovative therapies in cancer: A literature review

      Geldof, Tine; Rawal, Smita; Van Dyck, Walter; Huys, Isabelle (Future Medicine Ltd, 2019)
      To achieve therapeutic innovation in oncology, already expensive novel medicines are often concomitantly combined to potentially enhance effectiveness. While this aggravates the pricing problem, comparing effectiveness of novel yet expensive (concomitant) treatments is much needed for healthcare decision-making to deliver effective but affordable treatments. This study reviewed published clinical trials and real-world studies of targeted and immune therapies. In total, 48 studies compared and/or combined multiple novel products on breast, colorectal, lung and melanoma cancers. To a great extent, products evaluated in each study were owned by one manufacturer. However, cross-manufacturer assessments are also needed. Next to costs and intensive market competition, the absence of a regulatory framework enforcing real-world multiproduct studies prevents these from being conducted. Trusted third parties could facilitate such real-world studies, for which appropriate and efficient data access is needed.
    • De onthaalomgeving vanuit een service-operations perspectief

      Cardoen, Brecht; Gemmel, Paul; Robberecht, Rein (2013)
    • Evaluation of Hospital Service Level Agreements

      Berbée, Rieneke; Gemmel, Paul; Droesbeke, Brenda; Casteleyn, H.; Vandaele, Darline (2009)
    • Fostering multidisciplinary collaboration in drug discovery

      Erden, Zeynep; Ben-Menahem, Shiko; von Krogh, Georg; Schneider, Andreas; Koch, Guido; Widmer, Hans (R J Communications & Media World Ltd, 2019)
      Drug discovery teams combine specialists with in-depth knowledge from a variety of scientific disciplines. Such diversity in thought worlds poses a challenging exercise in cross-disciplinary collaboration and project coordination. Based on a longitudinal field study of five projects in a leading pharmaceutical company we present a framework outlining the conditions for effective cross-disciplinary collaboration in drug discovery teams. We show that knowledge creation in multidisciplinary teams relies on a combination of formal team structures and informal co-ordination practices. Formal team structures set the boundary conditions for cross-disciplinary co-ordination. Within their boundaries self-managed sub-teams draw on informal co-ordination practices involving cross-disciplinary anticipation, synchronization and triangulation to overcome knowledge boundaries and high uncertainty. We identify five key insights and two questions which are important for managers to consider for fostering multidisciplinary collaboration in drug discovery.
    • Hospital Process Orientation (HPO): The development of a measurement tool

      Gemmel, Paul; Vandaele, Darline; Tambeur, Wim (2008)
    • Impact of recurrent changes in the work environment on nurses' psychological well-being and sickness absence

      Verhaeghe, Rik; Vlerick, Peter; Gemmel, Paul; Van Maele, G.; De Backer, G. (2006)
    • Job stress among middle-aged health care workers and its relation to sickness absence

      Verhaeghe, Rik; Mak, R.; Van Maele, G.; Kornitzer, M.; De Backer, G. (2003)
    • Knowledge-flows and firm performance

      Erden, Zeynep; Klang, David; Sydler, Renato; von Krogh, Georg (Elsevier, 2014)
      This study advances the understanding of how knowledge-flows impact on firm performance. Incorporating recent research on the knowledge-based view of the firm, this paper tests and extends the knowledge flow model by using more fine-grained measures and by proposing a nonlinear effect. This study tests the predicted effects in a longitudinal research design with data on a global sample of public biopharmaceutical firms. The results largely support the expectation that knowledge-flows largely have a nonlinear impact on firm performance. However, one traditional measure of knowledge-flows, geographical location, turns out to have no significant influence in the extended model. The paper explains the implications of these findings for practice and research.