• Antecedents and consequences of collective psychological ownership: The validation of a conceptual model

      Giordano, Ana Paula; Patient, David; Passos, Ana Margarida; Sguera, Francesco (Journal of Organizational Behavior, 2020)
      We investigate team member feelings of collective psychological ownership (CPO) over teamwork products, the psychological paths that lead to it, and its impact on team workers' evaluations of team effectiveness, turnover intentions, and intentions to champion teamwork products. We focus on the teamwork product as an important target of ownership feelings, building on theories of self‐extension, psychological ownership, and team emergent states. In Study 1, we validate measures for three ownership activating experiences (OAE) that have been proposed as paths to CPO (control over, intimate knowledge regarding, and investment in the teamwork product) using two samples of individual team workers (n = 210 and n = 140). In Study 2 (n = 183) and Study 3 (n = 200), we use surveys and a multiwave design to show that team workers' feelings of CPO mediate the relationship between investment in and intimate knowledge regarding the product and team effectiveness evaluations, team turnover intentions, and intentions to champion the work product. In Study 4 (n = 48 teams), CPO was predicted by the ownership activating experiences, at the team level. This research additionally highlights the benefits to organizations of creating conditions for the emergence of employee feelings of shared ownership over teamwork products.
    • Motivated consumer innovativeness: Concept and measurement, and validation

      Vandecasteele, Bert; Geuens, Maggie (International Journal of Research in Marketing, 2010)
      Existing consumer innovativeness scales ignore the multitude of motivation sources of buying innovations. The objective of this paper is to incorporate different motivations into a multi-dimensional innovativeness scale to better account for the consumer–product relationship. An extensive literature review and five studies (with about 2600 respondents in total) indicate that four types of motivation underlie consumer innovativeness: functional, hedonic, social, and cognitive. The proposed 20-item four-dimensional Motivated Consumer Innovativeness (MCI) scale proves to be reliable and internally valid and does not seem to suffer from social desirability bias. Moreover, the results of the studies indicate the predictive validity of every MCI dimension. This new scale proves to measure more than existing consumer innovativeness scales; the different MCI dimensions predict innovative purchase intentions better than both traditional and recently developed innovativeness scales, and they disprove the general consensus that older people are always significantly less innovative than younger people. This MCI scale can serve as a tool for future research on efficiently and effectively segmenting and targeting (motivated innovative) consumers.