• Achieving learning potentials in an educational simulation game for trading and generating electrical energy

      Delarue, Erik; Laga, L.; Meeus, Leonardo; Belmans, Ronnie; D'haeseleer, William (2011)
    • An economic analysis of used electric vehicle batteries integrated into commercial building microgrids

      Beer, Sebastian; Gomez, D.; Dallinger, D.; Momber, Ilan; Marnay, Chris; Stadler, Michael; Lai, Judy (2012)
    • Appraisal of the European Commission's Energy Roadmap 2050

      Meeus, Leonardo (2012)
      Volume 2 - issue 2 - april 2012 - Issue 3 - geen pdf beschikbaar ook niet via stuiterproxy - ook niet op website enkel titelblad
    • Block order restrictions in combinatorial electric energy auctions

      Meeus, Leonardo; Verhaegen, K.; Belmans, Ronnie (2009)
    • Does more international transmission capacity increase competition in the Belgian electricity market

      Küpper, Gerd; Delarue, Erik; Delvaux, Bram; Meeus, Leonardo; Bekaert, David; Willems, Bert; Proost, Stef; D'haeseleer, William; Deketelaere, Kurt; Belmans, Ronnie (Elsevier, 2009)
    • DSO-TSO cooperation issues and solutions for distribution grid congestion management

      Hadush, Samson; Meeus, Leonardo (Elsevier, 2018)
      The role of DSOs is evolving due to the increasing penetration of intermittent and distributed energy resources in the distribution system. On the one hand, TSOs are accessing flexibility resources connected to the distribution grid. On the other hand, DSOs are actively managing distribution grid congestion, moving away from the conventional fit and forget approach. As a result, the need for DSO-TSO cooperation has become increasingly important. In this study, we first discuss market and grid operation issues related to different system states and the corresponding congestion management approaches, in the context of the European electricity market design and regulation. Second, we discuss viable solutions that are inspired by inter-TSO cooperation solutions as well as solutions that are being adopted by DSOs. Our findings show that the issues are rather similar both at transmission and distribution level; however, the need for cooperation and the solutions will depend on where structural congestion will occur and which borders will be managed. We also note that cooperation between DSOs as well as between DSOs and microgrids could become more important with the development of local energy markets in the long term.
    • Electricity market integration in Europe

      Meeus, Leonardo; Belmans, Ronnie (2008)
    • Electricity produced from renewable energy sources - what target are we aiming for?

      Verhaegen, K.; Meeus, Leonardo; Belmans, Ronnie; Delvaux, Bram (2007)
    • EU 2050 low-carbon energy future: visions and strategies

      Meeus, Leonardo; Azevedo, Isabel; Marcantonini, Claudio; Glachant, Jean-Michel; Hafner, Manfred (2012)
    • Evaluation of economic merger control techniques applied to the European electricity sector

      Vandezande, Leen; Meeus, Leonardo; Delvaux, Bram; Van Calster, Geert; Belmans, Ronnie (2006)
    • Experience with electricity market test suite: students versus computational agents

      Trinh, Quynh Chi; Saguan, Marcelo; Meeus, Leonardo (2013)
      This paper applies two experimental economics methods (i.e., agent-based modeling and laboratory experiment) to a market test suite that is based on a fictional European wholesale electricity market. Quantitative results of generators' strategic behavior in this market context are separated between generators played by human subjects (i.e., master students) in a laboratory experiment and generators represented by computational agents in an agent-based model. The behavior is measured through offers that students or agents make when participating in the electricity trading auction and the market outcomes under both methods are discussed in order to illustrate the difference between the behavior of human and computational agents. The paper also identifies the improvements that would need to be made to the market test suite to allow for a more conclusive comparison in future experiments.
    • Future-proof tariff design: Recovering sunk grid costs in a world where consumers are pushing back

      Schittekatte, Tim; Momber, Ilan; Meeus, Leonardo (Elsevier, 2018)
      Traditional analysis of distribution network tariff design assumes a lack of alternatives to grid connection for the fulfilment of consumers' electricity needs. This is radically changing with breakthroughs in two technologies: (1) Photovoltaics (PV) enable domestic and commercial consumers to self-produce energy; (2) Batteries allow consumers and self-producers to gain control over their grid energy and capacity parameters. Contributing to the state of the art, the grid cost recovery problem for the Distribution System Operator (DSO) is modelled as a non-cooperative game between consumers. In this game, the availability and costs of the two named technologies strategically interact with tariff structures. Four states of the world for user's access to technologies are distinguished and three tariff structures are evaluated. The assessed distribution network tariff structures are: energy volumetric charges with net-metering, energy volumetric charges for both injection and withdrawal, and capacity-based charges. Results show that in a state of the world with new technology choices for grid users both efficiency and equity issues can arise when distribution network charges are ill-designed.
    • Global vs. low carbon economy: The case of the revised EU emissions trading scheme

      Ahner, Nicole; Meeus, Leonardo (John Wiley & Sons Ltd, 2010)
    • Implementing the European internal energy market in 2005-2009, a proposal from Academia

      Glachant, Jean-Michel; Belmans, Ronnie; Meeus, Leonardo (2007)
    • Is advertising for losers? An empirical study from a value creation and value capturing perspective

      Tackx, Koen; Rothenberger, Sandra; Verdin, Paul (2017)
      Does advertising lead to higher profits? This question has preoccupied company executives and academic researchers for many decades. Arguments have been put forth in both directions, and evidence is mixed at best. In this article, we re-examine the question from a value creation and value capturing perspective, which allows us to re-interpret and reconcile the different views and empirically validate the resulting hypotheses. Using a database of the top 500 brands of established companies during the 2008-2015 period, we find that advertising spending has no significant impact on profitability, while both brand value and research and development (R&D) spending have a clearly positive effect. In addition, we observe a positive interaction effect between advertising spending and R&D spending and a negative interaction between brand value and R&D spending on profitability. These findings corroborate the view that advertising in and of itself does not improve profitability, rather, its effect is positive only when it acts in support of customer value creation as a result of R&D.
    • Market coupling and the importance of price coordination between power exchanges

      Meeus, Leonardo; Vandezande, Leen; Cole, S.; Belmans, Ronnie (2009)
    • Mobilizing cities towards a low-carbon future: Tambourines, carrots and sticks

      Azevedo, Isabel; Delarue, Erik; Meeus, Leonardo (2013)
      In the transition towards a low-carbon future in Europe, cities' actions are of major importance due to the prominence of urbanization, both in terms of population and in terms of greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions. As a result, we need city authorities to act, by using their competences as policy makers as well as energy users. However, cities are still not moving as fast as one might expect, indicating the need for additional incentives to prompt local action. Therefore, the aim of this paper is to present an overview of external incentives that might prompt cities to act and to highlight good practices that could be used in future initiatives. This paper first discusses how to evaluate the climate and energy performance of a city and how local authorities can contribute to its improvements. Moreover, it analyses the disincentives that local governments are confronted with, categorizing them as simple market failures, institutional failures and multi-agent failures. The paper then presents a survey of initiatives at national and EU levels to promote local action towards a low-carbon future; grouping them into tambourines, carrots and sticks. We focus on Austria, Germany, the Netherlands and Sweden because they are pioneering countries regarding energy policies for cities.