• Reforming the system of state assistance

      Sleuwaegen, Leo (2002)
      The question of state assistance took on particular significance in the 1980s, when the markets became more integrated. European experience has shown that state assistance can effectively assist the adaptation of enterprises to new economic conditions. At the same time, it has a negative influence on competition.
    • Regional cohesion in Europe? An analysis of how EU public RTD support influences the techno-economic regional landscape

      Clarysse, Bart (2001)
      To date, European Union (EU) policy has been in favor of balanced regional growth. Since the 1980s, EU has adopted a policy which aims to strengthen the science and technology bases of the member states, necessary to increase their competitiveness. This EU research, technology and development (RTD) policy also has to contribute to other Community policies such as economic cohesion. Competitiveness and cohesion are two basic elements which are necessary for a balanced economic growth. Despite these objectives, many economic and technological differences still exist between European regions. To show these differences, we present in this paper a new typology of regions which are categorized on the basis of their current state of economic and technological development, their short-term evolution in technological development and their short-term economic growth. Further, we analyze whether these different types of regions tend to converge or diverge, both economically and technologically. Because technological development is the foremost factor used to explain economic growth we further analyze the role of EU RTD policy to diffuse technology from the economically more advanced to the less advanced regions. To explore this question, we use a unique set of regional participation and collaboration data in the EU Framework Programs. Regional participation data is used to measure the direct impact of EU RTD policy on technology development, while the collaboration data is analyzed by means of social network techniques as an indicator of technology diffusion. It is shown that the current RTD policy enforces the technological strength of the best performing regions, but plays a clear role in technology diffusion towards a limited group of catching up regions.
    • Regional electricity market integration - France - Belgium - Netherlands

      Meeus, Leonardo; Glachant, Jean-Michel; Belmans, Ronnie (2006)
    • Regulated cross-border transmission investment in Europe

      Meeus, Leonardo; Purchala, K.; Van Hertem, Dirk; Belmans, Ronnie (2006)
    • Rekruteringsgids in goede en slechte tijden

      Van Bruystegem, Kristien (2009)
    • Relocation to get venture capital: a resource dependence perspective

      De Prijcker, Sofie; Manigart, Sophie; Collewaert, Veroniek
      Using a resource dependence perspective, we theorize and show that non-venture-capital-backed ventures founded in U.S. states with a lower availability of venture capital (VC) are more likely to relocate to California (CA) or Massachusetts (MA) — the two VC richest states — compared to ventures founded in states with a greater availability of VC. Moreover, controlling for self-selection, ventures that relocate to CA or MA subsequently have a greater probability of attracting initial VC compared to ventures that stay in their home state. We discuss the implications for theory, future research, and practice.
    • Relocation to get venture capital: A resource dependence perspective (Published Online)

      De Prijcker, Sofie; Manigart, Sophie; Collewaert, Veroniek; Vanacker, Tom (Sage, 2017)
      Using a resource dependence perspective, we theorize and show that non-venture-capital-backed ventures founded in U.S. states with a lower availability of venture capital (VC) are more likely to relocate to California (CA) or Massachusetts (MA)—the two VC-richest states—compared to ventures founded in states with a greater availability of VC. Moreover, controlling for self-selection, ventures that relocate to CA or MA subsequently have a greater probability of attracting initial VC compared to ventures that stay in their home state. We discuss the implications for theory, future research, and practice.
    • The reputational effects of analysts' stock recommendations and credit ratings: Evidence from operational risk announcements in the financial industry

      Barakat, Ahmed; Ashby, Simon; Fenn, Paul (Elsevier, 2018)
      This paper investigates whether more favorable stock recommendations and higher credit ratings serve as a reputational asset or reputational liability around reputation-damaging events. Analyzing the reputational effects of operational risk announcements incurred by financial institutions, we find that firms with a “Buy” stock recommendation or “Speculative Grade” credit rating are more likely to incur an equity-based reputational damage. In addition, firms with lower credit ratings incur a much more severe debt-based reputational damage. Moreover, credit ratings are more instrumental in mitigating the debt-based reputational damage caused by fraud incidents or incurred in non-banking activities. Furthermore, the misconduct of senior management could demolish the reputation of firms with less heterogeneous stock recommendations. Finally, credit ratings serve as an equity-based reputational asset in the short term but turn into an equity-based reputational liability in the long term. Overall, our analysis reveals that stock recommendations represent a reputational burden and credit ratings act as a reputational shield; however, the persistence and magnitude of such reputational effects are moderated by time and event characteristics.
    • Reservation and allocation policies for influenza vaccines

      Samii, Behzad; Pibernik, Richard; Yadav, Prashant; Vereecke, Ann (2012)
    • Resource-constrained project scheduling with activity splitting and setup times

      Vanhoucke, Mario; Coelho, José (Elsevier, 2019)
      This paper presents a new solution algorithm to solve the resource-constrained project scheduling problem with activity splitting and setup times. The option of splitting activities, known as activity preemption, has been studied in literature from various angles, and an overview of the main contributions will be given. The solution algorithm makes use of a meta-heuristic search for the resource-constrained project scheduling problem (RCPSP) using network transformations to split activities in subparts. More precisely, the project network is split up such that all possible preemptive parts are incorporated into an extended network as so-called activity segments, and setup times are incorporated between the different activity segments. Due to the inherent complexity to solve the problem for such huge project networks, a solution approach is proposed that selects the appropriate activity segments and ignores the remaining segments using a boolean satisfiability problem solver, and afterwards schedules these projects to near-optimality with the renewable resource constraints. The algorithm has been tested using a large computational experiment with five types of setup times. Moreover, an extension to the problem with overlaps between preemptive parts of activities has been proposed and it is shown that our algorithm can easily cope with this extension without changing it. Computational experiments show that activity preemption sometimes leads to makespan reductions without requiring a lot of splits in the activities. Moreover, is shown that the degree of these makespan reductions depends on the network and resource indicators of the project instance.
    • Resources access needs and capabilities as mediators of the relationship between VC firm size and syndication

      Verwaal, Ernst; Bruining, Hans; Wright, Mike; Manigart, Sophie; Lockett, Andy (Springer, 2010)
    • Responding to Societal Expectations

      Lenssen, Gilbert; Van den Berghe, Lutgart; Louche, Céline (2005)