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dc.contributor.authorManigart, Sophie
dc.contributor.authorLockett, Andy
dc.contributor.authorMeuleman, Miguel
dc.contributor.authorWright, Mike
dc.contributor.authorLandström, Hans
dc.contributor.authorBruining, Hans
dc.contributor.authorDesbrières, Philippe
dc.contributor.authorHommel, Ulrich
dc.date.accessioned2017-12-02T14:23:39Z
dc.date.available2017-12-02T14:23:39Z
dc.date.issued2006
dc.identifier.doi10.1111/j.1540-6520.2006.00115.x
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/20.500.12127/2059
dc.description.abstractFinancial theory, access to deal flow, selection, and monitoring skills are used to explain syndication in venture capital firms in six European countries. In contrast with U.S. findings, portfolio management motives are more important for syndication than individual deal management motives. Risk sharing, portfolio diversification, and access to larger deals are more important than selection and monitoring of deals. This holds for later stage and for early stage investors. Value adding is a stronger motive for syndication for early stage investors than for later stage investors, however. Nonlead investors join syndicates for the selection and value‐adding skills of the syndicate partners.
dc.language.isoen
dc.subjectCorporate Finance
dc.subjectMergers & Acquisitions
dc.titleVenture capitalists' decision to syndicate
dc.identifier.journalEntrepreneurship: Theory and Practice
dc.source.volume30
dc.source.issue2
dc.source.beginpage131
dc.source.endpage153
vlerick.knowledgedomainAccounting & Finance
vlerick.typearticleFT ranked journal article  
vlerick.vlerickdepartmentA&F
vlerick.vlerickdepartmentEGS
dc.identifier.vperid134361
dc.identifier.vperid140569
dc.identifier.vperid140746
dc.identifier.vperid93826
dc.identifier.vperid68185
dc.identifier.vperid35884
dc.identifier.vperid58266
dc.identifier.vperid68189
dc.identifier.vpubid2323


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