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dc.contributor.authorNardon, Luciara
dc.contributor.authorSteers, Richard
dc.date.accessioned2017-12-02T14:24:22Z
dc.date.available2017-12-02T14:24:22Z
dc.date.issued2008
dc.identifier.issn0090-2616
dc.identifier.doi10.1016/j.orgdyn.2007.11.006
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/20.500.12127/2458
dc.description.abstractMany years ago, a popular film making the rounds of the local movie theatres was If It's Tuesday, It Must Be Belgium. The film used humor to highlight the plight of a typical American tourist who was overcome by the cultural differences across the countries included in her whirlwind tour of Europe. The film's underlying message was that tourists – at least American tourists – seldom allow sufficient time in their travels to learn about cultural differences, preferring instead to race from one popular tourist site to another in search of good food, unique experiences, and photographs to show to their friends and family back home. The issue is one of having been there, not having learned anything. Today, despite a widespread recognition that we live and work in an increasingly interconnected global economy, it is curious that the dilemma posed in this old film is still salient for many contemporary managers and entrepreneurs alike. How serious are we about learning about other cultures? And if we are serious, how do we accomplish this in meaningful ways as part of our busy work schedules?
dc.language.isoen
dc.subjectPeople Management & Leadership
dc.titleThe New Global Manager: Learning cultures on the fly
dc.identifier.journalOrganizational Dynamics
dc.source.volume37
dc.source.issue1
dc.source.beginpage47
dc.source.endpage59
vlerick.knowledgedomainPeople Management & Leadership
vlerick.typearticleVlerick strategic journal article
vlerick.vlerickdepartmentP&O
dc.identifier.vperid101871
dc.identifier.vperid139148
dc.identifier.vpubid2761


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