• Bringing German Cooperative Bank Berlin back on track: Can a rural bank thrive in the city? (A)

      Verweire, Kurt; De Grande, Jonathan; Letens, Geert; Slagmulder, Regine (2011)
      This is part of a case series. The GCB Berlin cases describe a strategic transformation process of a German bank. Over a period of 3 years, GCB Berlin has transformed into a customer-intimate financial institution. The management team of the company used Strategy Mapping, the Balanced Scorecard, and a new sales-and-service approach as transformation tools to get the entire organization more strategy-focused. The (A) case, 'Bringing German Cooperative Bank Berlin back on track: Can a rural bank thrive in the city?,' sets the scene and describes the challenges Arthur Berthold faced when he entered as a newly appointed director. The (A) case provides more information on the personal background of Arthur Berthold, and on his track record with previous employers. Furthermore, the case describes German Cooperative Bank (GCB) Berlin, a subsidiary of the German Cooperative Banking Group. After working some weeks in this new organization, Arthur detected fundamental financial and cultural problems. He decided to tackle the challenges by launching a Balanced Scorecard project, but was struggling how to do it. Should he opt for a top-down approach, or is a bottom-up approach more appropriate? The case, 'German Cooperative Bank Berlin (B): Managing people, customers, and financial results,' describes the start of the change process at GCB Berlin. The (B) case describes how Arthur Berthold transformed GCB Berlin from an undifferentiated and unprofitable bank into a real customer-oriented, profitable financial institution. The top management team launched two strategy maps, one for the Retail Division and one for the Corporate Division. The (B) case describes how the strategy maps were introduced and what were the effects on the management culture and the operations of the organization. The (B) case also describes a change in the sales-and-service culture within the Retail Division through the introduction of the Cohen Brown program.
    • Cadbury Schweppes (C): The performance management process

      Haspeslagh, Philippe; Slagmulder, Regine; Bloemhof, M. (2003)
      This is the third of a three case series. The (A) case describes the situation of Cadbury Schweppes (CS) and its sugar confectionery business, in a state of 'satisfactory underperformance' in which past strategies and practices make it hard for new management to initiate change in this widely respected company. The (B) case shows how from 1997 to 1999 John Sunderland, the new CEO and a new divisional manager used value based management (VBM) as a vehicle for transforming respectively the company and the sugar confectionery division with strong emphasis on people and leadership practices. The (C) case describes how CS' performance management system was redesigned in line with the Managing for Value (MfV) philosophy. It illustrates the new management performance process in action in the beverages business in Spain, where the country manager is faced with major competitive challenges. The immediate purpose of the Cadbury Schweppes series is to allow an informed discussion on the use and implementation of value based management, from a broader managerial rather than the typical financial perspective. The broader purpose is to illustrate how VBM can lead to corporate transformation and a sharpening of leadership practices in large firms. The series further describes how the design of the performance management system supports the implementation of MfV.
    • Customer profitability analysis and value based management at Barclays Bank

      Slagmulder, Regine; Mukherjee, J. (2004)
      In response to the intensified competition in the banking industry, Barclays adopted a Value Based Management (VBM) programme to align decision making at all levels in the organisation with the interests of its shareholders. Under the umbrella of this VBM programme the Bank introduced a new approach to identifying and effectively managing its high-value customers. The case shows how the new customer value measurement tool had a significant impact on managerial decision making and how it was supported by value-based sales incentives. The purpose of the case is to provide an illustration of customer profitability analysis in the context of a 'managing for value' initiative at a leading European bank. The case shows how the Bank's external financial goal of top quartile shareholder return was translated into an internal focus on economic profit, which in turn was cascaded to the front line through value-based sales targets. The objective of the case discussion is to explore the benefits and challenges of adopting a value-aligned performance measurement tool to help the salesforce identify high-value customers and take action to boost customer profitability and create shareholder value.
    • Digi-Tec: The VC investor exit decision

      Paeleman, Ine; Manigart, Sophie; Slagmulder, Regine (2019)
      Digi-Tec was a growing ICT firm and achieved growth both organically and through mergers and acquisitions (M&As). The large number of shareholders had divergent goals and visions for the future. In order to ensure further growth, two main shareholders searched for an external investor to buy out the others and thereby align and strengthen its governance. In 2011 the Spain-based private equity firm SRIC invested in Digi-Tec. This case documents the interactions between the external investor and the management. An exit opportunity arose much earlier than expected. The investment manager is faced with the question whether it is optimal to exit already after three years, or rather to stay on board for some more years as initially planned.
    • Epilogue German Cooperative Bank Berlin

      Verweire, Kurt; De Grande, Jonathan; Letens, Geert; Slagmulder, Regine (2011)
      This is part of a case series. The GCB Berlin cases describe a strategic transformation process of a German bank. Over a period of 3 years, GCB Berlin has transformed into a customer-intimate financial institution. The management team of the company used Strategy Mapping, the Balanced Scorecard, and a new sales-and-service approach as transformation tools to get the entire organization more strategy-focused. The (A) case, 'Bringing German Cooperative Bank Berlin back on track: Can a rural bank thrive in the city?,' sets the scene and describes the challenges Arthur Berthold faced when he entered as a newly appointed director. The (A) case provides more information on the personal background of Arthur Berthold, and on his track record with previous employers. Furthermore, the case describes German Cooperative Bank (GCB) Berlin, a subsidiary of the German Cooperative Banking Group. After working some weeks in this new organization, Arthur detected fundamental financial and cultural problems. He decided to tackle the challenges by launching a Balanced Scorecard project, but was struggling how to do it. Should he opt for a top-down approach, or is a bottom-up approach more appropriate? The case, 'German Cooperative Bank Berlin (B): Managing people, customers, and financial results,' describes the start of the change process at GCB Berlin. The (B) case describes how Arthur Berthold transformed GCB Berlin from an undifferentiated and unprofitable bank into a real customer-oriented, profitable financial institution. The top management team launched two strategy maps, one for the Retail Division and one for the Corporate Division. The (B) case describes how the strategy maps were introduced and what were the effects on the management culture and the operations of the organization. The (B) case also describes a change in the sales-and-service culture within the Retail Division through the introduction of the Cohen Brown program.
    • German Cooperative Bank Berlin (B): Managing people, customers, and financial results

      Verweire, Kurt; De Grande, Jonathan; Letens, Geert; Slagmulder, Regine (2011)
      This is part of a case series. The GCB Berlin cases describe a strategic transformation process of a German bank. Over a period of 3 years, GCB Berlin has transformed into a customer-intimate financial institution. The management team of the company used Strategy Mapping, the Balanced Scorecard, and a new sales-and-service approach as transformation tools to get the entire organization more strategy-focused. The (A) case, 'Bringing German Cooperative Bank Berlin back on track: Can a rural bank thrive in the city?,' sets the scene and describes the challenges Arthur Berthold faced when he entered as a newly appointed director. The (A) case provides more information on the personal background of Arthur Berthold, and on his track record with previous employers. Furthermore, the case describes German Cooperative Bank (GCB) Berlin, a subsidiary of the German Cooperative Banking Group. After working some weeks in this new organization, Arthur detected fundamental financial and cultural problems. He decided to tackle the challenges by launching a Balanced Scorecard project, but was struggling how to do it. Should he opt for a top-down approach, or is a bottom-up approach more appropriate? The case, 'German Cooperative Bank Berlin (B): Managing people, customers, and financial results,' describes the start of the change process at GCB Berlin. The (B) case describes how Arthur Berthold transformed GCB Berlin from an undifferentiated and unprofitable bank into a real customer-oriented, profitable financial institution. The top management team launched two strategy maps, one for the Retail Division and one for the Corporate Division. The (B) case describes how the strategy maps were introduced and what were the effects on the management culture and the operations of the organization. The (B) case also describes a change in the sales-and-service culture within the Retail Division through the introduction of the Cohen Brown program.
    • German Cooperative Bank Berlin (C): Turning the bank into a performance-oriented organization

      Verweire, Kurt; De Grande, Jonathan; Letens, Geert; Slagmulder, Regine (2011)
      This is part of a case series. The GCB Berlin cases describe a strategic transformation process of a German bank. Over a period of 3 years, GCB Berlin has transformed into a customer-intimate financial institution. The management team of the company used Strategy Mapping, the Balanced Scorecard, and a new sales-and-service approach as transformation tools to get the entire organization more strategy-focused. The (A) case, 'Bringing German Cooperative Bank Berlin back on track: Can a rural bank thrive in the city?,' sets the scene and describes the challenges Arthur Berthold faced when he entered as a newly appointed director. The (A) case provides more information on the personal background of Arthur Berthold, and on his track record with previous employers. Furthermore, the case describes German Cooperative Bank (GCB) Berlin, a subsidiary of the German Cooperative Banking Group. After working some weeks in this new organization, Arthur detected fundamental financial and cultural problems. He decided to tackle the challenges by launching a Balanced Scorecard project, but was struggling how to do it. Should he opt for a top-down approach, or is a bottom-up approach more appropriate? The case, 'German Cooperative Bank Berlin (B): Managing people, customers, and financial results,' describes the start of the change process at GCB Berlin. The (B) case describes how Arthur Berthold transformed GCB Berlin from an undifferentiated and unprofitable bank into a real customer-oriented, profitable financial institution. The top management team launched two strategy maps, one for the Retail Division and one for the Corporate Division. The (B) case describes how the strategy maps were introduced and what were the effects on the management culture and the operations of the organization. The (B) case also describes a change in the sales-and-service culture within the Retail Division through the introduction of the Cohen Brown program.
    • Hewlett-Packard: Performance Measurement in the Supply Chain

      Slagmulder, Regine; Grottoli, D.; Van Wassenhove, L. (2004)
      This is a condensed version. In a maturing market, Hewlett-Packard's (HP) attention moved from Return on Sales to Return on Net Assets. Mismatches between demand and supply, aggrevated by a long supply chain, were a burden on profit. HP realised that conventional logistics costs (warehousing, inventories, transport) were only the tip of the iceberg. Hidden underneath were large costs due to price protection, material devaluation, returns and obsoletes (Inventory Driven Costs). Uncovering all true demand/supply mismatch costs allowed HP to redress the situation and restore competitiveness. The case aims to illustrate the strategic impact of supply chain management and the increasing cost of supply/demand mismatches. To enable sound decision making (eg in prioritising supply chain improvement projects), a clear link needs to be established between supply chain performance indicators and bottom-line impact.
    • Pine Products Inc: Value drivers and the balanced scorecard

      Slagmulder, Regine; Young, D. (2004)
      The case describes how Pine Products, a formerly state-owned company in the chemicals industry, transformed itself into a high-performance organisation following its privatisation. It highlights the need for the company to redesign its performance measurement and reward systems in line with the Value-Based Management (VBM) philosophy implemented by the holding company. The case centres on the issue of how the day-to-day operating activities of the business can be linked to the Group's value- creating mission through a set of actionable value drivers and performance indicators that tie into Economic Value Added. The primary purpose of the Pine Products case is to allow an informed discussion about how to design a performance management system that supports the implementation of VBM across all levels of the organisation and that focuses people's attention on the key drivers of economic profit. The broader purpose is to illustrate how aggressive implementation of the shareholder value-creation imperative under VBM can lead to radical corporate transformation.
    • Royal Bank of Canada: Creating profitable relations with small business clients

      Slagmulder, Regine; Grottoli, D. (2005)
      Royal Bank of Canada or RBC, Canada's largest financial services group, is at the forefront of customer profitability analysis. The case illustrates how RBC uses customer profitability data to identify profit opportunities and make strategic decisions about its customer mix. In particular, it illustrates how the new customer-level information enabled RBC to recognise the untapped profit potential of its small business client portfolio. The purpose of this case is to illustrate how financial institutions like RBC can use customer profitability analysis to identify and enhance the profit potential of its various customer segments. The case describes the elements of RBC's customer value metric and how the bank reaped the benefits from targeted sales and marketing efforts informed by the customer-focused profitability analysis.
    • Sainsbury's (A): Transforming the supply chain

      Slagmulder, Regine; Grottoli, D.; Corsten, D. (2003)
      This is the first of a two-case series (603-020-1 and 103-057-1). In 2000, under increasing competitive pressure from other major UK retailers, J Sainsbury's Supermarkets embarked on a radical transformation of its supply chain. The case study describes the challenges involved in rejuvenating the firm's supply chain infrastructure, systems, processes, and skill sets as part of an 'all-or-nothing' strategy to regain a leadership position in the marketplace. The teaching objectives are: (1) to learn about recent developments in supply chain configuration and information systems in the retail industry, and (2) to assess the opportunities and risks associated with major investments in supply chain restructuring.
    • Sainsbury's (B): Supply Chain Performance Measurement

      Slagmulder, Regine; Grottoli, D.; Corsten, D. (2003)
      This is the second of a two-case series (603-020-1 and 103-057-1). The (B) case focuses on the performance measurement tools that Sainsbury's has implemented to improve the efficiency and effectiveness of its supplier relations. It describes the internal information system that provides up-to-date performance data on suppliers as well as an Internet- enabled system aimed at sharing daily supply chain information with suppliers. The case also demonstrates how a performance assessment tool called the Global Scorecard helps Sainsbury's and its suppliers identify opportunities for jointly improving their interface. The teaching objectives are: (1) to illustrate state-of-the-art information systems aimed at measuring and managing supplier performance in a retail context, and (2) to discuss how retailers and suppliers can work together to improve the efficiency of their interface and strengthen their relationship.
    • Sodexho (A): Creating strategic alignment with the balanced scorecard

      Slagmulder, Regine; Van Wassenhove, L.; Zingales, F. (2007)
      The case puts the students in the role of a member of a management team trying to create a strategy map and balanced scorecard, in an attempt to ensure alignment about strategic objectives and how to reach them. The teaching objecties are: (1) to show the usefulness of strategy maps (to create a balanced scorecard) as a tool to create alignment between the members of an executive committee, and (2) letting the students discover the process through a role-playing exercise.
    • Sodexho (B): Balanced Scorecard and Performance Indicators

      Slagmulder, Regine; Van Wassenhove, L.; Zingales, F. (2007)
    • Strategy and performance management at DSM

      Haspeslagh, Philippe; Slagmulder, Regine; Bloemhof, M. (2004)
      The case describes the strategic planning process and performance management system implemented at DSM, a global chemical company. In particular, it describes how the company's value based business steering system is designed to create alignment between strategy formulation and execution through strategic value contracts. The case illustrates the performance management process in action at one of the business groups. It highlights managers' dilemma between continuing to pursue the current business strategy which is in line with corporate strategy, versus responding to the financial pressures exerted by the new value based management approach which would require a radical change in strategy. The case allows students to discuss the various elements of DSM's value based management (VBM)-inspired strategy and performance management processes, and how they impact one of the business groups' efforts to improve performance. The class can analyse the strengths and weaknesses of the company's approach to aligning its strategic planning and financial management processes by introducing strategic value contracts. Finally, the case shows how DSM distinguishes between performance indicators to monitor strategy implementation, and value drivers to measure economic value creation.
    • The Scotts Company (A): Transforming the European supply chain

      Van Wassenhove, L.; Slagmulder, Regine; Vaysman, M. (2002)
      This is part of a case series. Case (A) describes how a major player in the agricultural chemicals industry struggles to transform a fragmented group of newly acquired businesses into an integrated supply chain. The case highlights the firm's operational and organizational problems from the perspective of the European supply chain manager, whose primary objective is to streamline operations and cut costs.
    • The Scotts Company (B): Developing a supply chain balanced scorecard

      Van Wassenhove, L.; Slagmulder, Regine; Vaysman, M. (2002)
      This is part of a case series. The case briefly outlines the European strategy for a major player in the agricultural chemicals industry. This description provides the basis for developing a Balanced Scorecard program to help align the firm's European supply chain operations with the company's strategic goals. Case (B) is designed to allow students to develop some hands-on experience in building a balanced scorecard that addresses the supply chain issues discussed in the (A) case. The case demonstrates how a supply chain scorecard provides a framework for improving operational efficiency as well as long-term value creation.
    • The Scotts Company: Note to the (A) case: what happened in 2000-2003

      Van Wassenhove, L.; Slagmulder, Regine; Mortensen, Nikolaj (2007)
      This supplement is to accompany the case. Case (A) describes how a major player in the agricultural chemicals industry struggles to transform a fragmented group of newly acquired businesses into an integrated supply chain. The case highlights the firm's operational and organizational problems from the perspective of the European supply chain manager, whose primary objective is to streamline operations and cut costs.