• N.V. Röthlisberger. A, B, C, D en E, Gevallenstudie

      Ooghe, Hubert; De Bourdeaudhuij, C. (UGent, Fac. Economie & Bedrijfskunde, 1995)
    • Case DRC Natuur A en B + Teacher's Note

      Manigart, Sophie; Schaillée, P. (1996)
    • Rabobank Nederland

      Gouka, P.T.; Sprokholt, E.; Thibeault, André (Nyenrode Business Universiteit, 1996)
    • Debafi N.V

      De Clercq, Dirk; Ooghe, Hubert; Sierens, Nathalie (1998)
    • Deugdelijk Bestuur in autonome gemeentebedrijven

      Van den Berghe, Lutgart; Levrau, Abigail (2000)
    • The tufted carpets industry in Belgium (A)

      Vanhaverbeke, Wim (2000)
      This is the first of a two-case series (300-094-1 and 300-095-1). This case study focuses on the international competitiveness of the Belgian tufted carpet industry. The case study is an illustration of the theory developed by Porter in his book 'The Competitive Advantage of Nations'. Belgian manufacturers became the most competitive carpet producers in the EU during the 1980s due to their production flexibility, which was supported by flat organisational structures. Due to the relatively small domestic market, companies were forced early on to export in different neighbouring countries. The small domestic market was an initial selective disadvantage that has been changed into a competitive advantage, as Belgian manufacturers were very flexible in serving export markets with different tastes. The large throughput allowed them, in turn, to invest heavily in state-of-the-art technology bringing down unit production costs. At the end of the 80s, the industry observers fear stagnation and price wars as customers discover substituting floor coverings. New export markets should offer relief. The (B) case updates the Belgian carpet industry for 1999, reviewing the changes in the competitive environment in the last seven years. A technical note 'Competitive Advantage of Nations: The Belgian Case' (300-094-6) is available to accompany the case series.
    • The tufted carpets industry in Belgium (B)

      Vanhaverbeke, Wim; Gerstkamp, Philip; Haggart, Cory; Sterzl, Verena; Tontchev, C. (2000)
      This is the second of a two-case series (300-094-1 and 300-095-1). This case study focuses on the international competitiveness of the Belgian tufted carpet industry. The case study is an illustration of the theory developed by Porter in his book 'The Competitive Advantage of Nations'. Belgian manufacturers became the most competitive carpet producers in the EU during the 1980s due to their production flexibility, which was supported by flat organisational structures. Due to the relatively small domestic market, companies were forced early on to export in different neighbouring countries. The small domestic market was an initial selective disadvantage that has been changed into a competitive advantage, as Belgian manufacturers were very flexible in serving export markets with different tastes. The large throughput allowed them, in turn, to invest heavily in state-of-the-art technology bringing down unit production costs. At the end of the 80s, the industry observers fear stagnation and price wars as customers discover substituting floor coverings. New export markets should offer relief. The (B) case updates the Belgian carpet industry for 1999, reviewing the changes in the competitive environment in the last seven years. A technical note 'Competitive Advantage of Nations: The Belgian Case' (300-094-6) is available to accompany the case series.
    • Competitive advantage of nations: The Belgian Case

      Vanhaverbeke, Wim (2000)
      This note accompanies the case series 'The Tufted Carpets Industry in Belgium' (300-094-1 and 300-095-1). The abstract for the case is as follows: This case study focuses on the international competitiveness of the Belgian tufted carpet industry. The case study is an illustration of the theory developed by Porter in his book 'The Competitive Advantage of Nations'. Belgian manufacturers became the most competitive carpet producers in the EU during the 1980s due to their production flexibility, which was supported by flat organisational structures. Due to the relatively small domestic market, companies were forced early on to export in different neighbouring countries. The small domestic market was an initial selective disadvantage that has been changed into a competitive advantage, as Belgian manufacturers were very flexible in serving export markets with different tastes. The large throughput allowed them, in turn, to invest heavily in state-of-the-art technology bringing down unit production costs. At the end of the 80s, the industry observers fear stagnation and price wars as customers discover substituting floor coverings. New export markets should offer relief. The (B) case updates the Belgian carpet industry for 1999, reviewing the changes in the competitive environment in the last seven years.
    • The tufted carpets industry in Belgium: Teaching Note (A+B)

      Vanhaverbeke, Wim; Gerstkamp, Philip; Haggart, Cory; Sterzl, Verena; Tontchev, C. (2000)
    • IT enabled change: the TPI project at Philips

      De Graaf, Anouk; Vanhaverbeke, Wim (2001)
    • The Scotts Company (A): Transforming the European supply chain

      Van Wassenhove, L.; Slagmulder, Regine; Vaysman, M. (2002)
      This is part of a case series. Case (A) describes how a major player in the agricultural chemicals industry struggles to transform a fragmented group of newly acquired businesses into an integrated supply chain. The case highlights the firm's operational and organizational problems from the perspective of the European supply chain manager, whose primary objective is to streamline operations and cut costs.
    • The Scotts Company (B): Developing a supply chain balanced scorecard

      Van Wassenhove, L.; Slagmulder, Regine; Vaysman, M. (2002)
      This is part of a case series. The case briefly outlines the European strategy for a major player in the agricultural chemicals industry. This description provides the basis for developing a Balanced Scorecard program to help align the firm's European supply chain operations with the company's strategic goals. Case (B) is designed to allow students to develop some hands-on experience in building a balanced scorecard that addresses the supply chain issues discussed in the (A) case. The case demonstrates how a supply chain scorecard provides a framework for improving operational efficiency as well as long-term value creation.
    • Eastpak - JanSport case study

      Geuens, Maggie; Goessaert, Geert; Mast, Gitte; Weijters, Bert (2002)
    • Sainsbury's (A): Transforming the supply chain

      Slagmulder, Regine; Grottoli, D.; Corsten, D. (2003)
      This is the first of a two-case series (603-020-1 and 103-057-1). In 2000, under increasing competitive pressure from other major UK retailers, J Sainsbury's Supermarkets embarked on a radical transformation of its supply chain. The case study describes the challenges involved in rejuvenating the firm's supply chain infrastructure, systems, processes, and skill sets as part of an 'all-or-nothing' strategy to regain a leadership position in the marketplace. The teaching objectives are: (1) to learn about recent developments in supply chain configuration and information systems in the retail industry, and (2) to assess the opportunities and risks associated with major investments in supply chain restructuring.
    • Sainsbury's (B): Supply Chain Performance Measurement

      Slagmulder, Regine; Grottoli, D.; Corsten, D. (2003)
      This is the second of a two-case series (603-020-1 and 103-057-1). The (B) case focuses on the performance measurement tools that Sainsbury's has implemented to improve the efficiency and effectiveness of its supplier relations. It describes the internal information system that provides up-to-date performance data on suppliers as well as an Internet- enabled system aimed at sharing daily supply chain information with suppliers. The case also demonstrates how a performance assessment tool called the Global Scorecard helps Sainsbury's and its suppliers identify opportunities for jointly improving their interface. The teaching objectives are: (1) to illustrate state-of-the-art information systems aimed at measuring and managing supplier performance in a retail context, and (2) to discuss how retailers and suppliers can work together to improve the efficiency of their interface and strengthen their relationship.
    • Cadbury Schweppes (C): The performance management process

      Haspeslagh, Philippe; Slagmulder, Regine; Bloemhof, M. (2003)
      This is the third of a three case series. The (A) case describes the situation of Cadbury Schweppes (CS) and its sugar confectionery business, in a state of 'satisfactory underperformance' in which past strategies and practices make it hard for new management to initiate change in this widely respected company. The (B) case shows how from 1997 to 1999 John Sunderland, the new CEO and a new divisional manager used value based management (VBM) as a vehicle for transforming respectively the company and the sugar confectionery division with strong emphasis on people and leadership practices. The (C) case describes how CS' performance management system was redesigned in line with the Managing for Value (MfV) philosophy. It illustrates the new management performance process in action in the beverages business in Spain, where the country manager is faced with major competitive challenges. The immediate purpose of the Cadbury Schweppes series is to allow an informed discussion on the use and implementation of value based management, from a broader managerial rather than the typical financial perspective. The broader purpose is to illustrate how VBM can lead to corporate transformation and a sharpening of leadership practices in large firms. The series further describes how the design of the performance management system supports the implementation of MfV.
    • Venturing into e-commerce in the MRO market

      Muylle, Steve; Croon, Eric (Vlerick Business School, 2003)
      Eric Croon, head of e-commerce at the Baudoin Group, must make decisions about how to adapt his business to the threats and opportunities posed by the Internet. A central issue is how this leading distributor of mechanical maintenance, repair, and operating (MRO) supplies in Belgium, Luxembourg and the Netherlands should deal with: (1) the Internet's disintermediation threat, (2) large customers upcoming demand for electronic procurement system integration, and (3) the participation of its largest competitor in a digital marketplace initiative for MRO supplies.
    • Case NewCo

      Clarysse, Bart (2003)
    • Strategic Positioning at Interbrew: to Beck's or not to Beck's

      Muylle, Steve; Van Doorselaere, Ignace (Vlerick Business School, 2003)
      Interbrew, the world second largest brewer headquartered in Belgium, needs to assess whether entering the German market through the acquisition of Beck's is in line with its well-established, successful strategic positioning paradigm. Given the record high acquisition price, Interbrew needs strong argumentation whether the deal would make strategic sense.