• Bringing German Cooperative Bank Berlin back on track: Can a rural bank thrive in the city? (A)

      Verweire, Kurt; De Grande, Jonathan; Letens, Geert; Slagmulder, Regine (2011)
      This is part of a case series. The GCB Berlin cases describe a strategic transformation process of a German bank. Over a period of 3 years, GCB Berlin has transformed into a customer-intimate financial institution. The management team of the company used Strategy Mapping, the Balanced Scorecard, and a new sales-and-service approach as transformation tools to get the entire organization more strategy-focused. The (A) case, 'Bringing German Cooperative Bank Berlin back on track: Can a rural bank thrive in the city?,' sets the scene and describes the challenges Arthur Berthold faced when he entered as a newly appointed director. The (A) case provides more information on the personal background of Arthur Berthold, and on his track record with previous employers. Furthermore, the case describes German Cooperative Bank (GCB) Berlin, a subsidiary of the German Cooperative Banking Group. After working some weeks in this new organization, Arthur detected fundamental financial and cultural problems. He decided to tackle the challenges by launching a Balanced Scorecard project, but was struggling how to do it. Should he opt for a top-down approach, or is a bottom-up approach more appropriate? The case, 'German Cooperative Bank Berlin (B): Managing people, customers, and financial results,' describes the start of the change process at GCB Berlin. The (B) case describes how Arthur Berthold transformed GCB Berlin from an undifferentiated and unprofitable bank into a real customer-oriented, profitable financial institution. The top management team launched two strategy maps, one for the Retail Division and one for the Corporate Division. The (B) case describes how the strategy maps were introduced and what were the effects on the management culture and the operations of the organization. The (B) case also describes a change in the sales-and-service culture within the Retail Division through the introduction of the Cohen Brown program.
    • Case study: Deal making in troubled waters: the ABN AMRO TAKEOVER

      Cossin, Didier; Keuleneer, Luc (2009)
      In a letter to ABN AMRO in February 2007, TCI, a British hedge fund with a small stake in ABN AMRO, stated: 'We believe that it would be in the interests of all shareholders, other stakeholders and ABN AMRO for the Managing Board of ABN AMRO to actively pursue the potential break up, spin-off, sale or merger of its various businesses (or as a whole)'. Eight months later, after a head-to-head battle with Barclays, the bank was finally sold to a Royal Bank of Scotland-led consortium, which included Banco Santander of Spain and Fortis, the Belgo-Dutch group. It was the largest financial services transaction ever and the first time that bidders had attempted to break up a large lender. This case looks at the events that led up to the takeover and examines some of the strategic decisions of the recent past which may have triggered the process. It discusses the financing and timing of the deal in the turbulent financial markets of 2007 and raises questions about the future. What were the risks of splitting the bank? Could this complex task be achieved successfully? Learning objectives: This integrative case gives participants an overview of the different aspects of a takeover: finance and control, integrated risk management, strategy. Issues for discussion include: (1) strategic lessons for the future of banking in Europe and worldwide, and (2) strengths and weaknesses of the two bids regarding valuation, synergies, timing, deal structure, concerns regarding integration planning and implementation.
    • Customer profitability analysis and value based management at Barclays Bank

      Slagmulder, Regine; Mukherjee, J. (2004)
      In response to the intensified competition in the banking industry, Barclays adopted a Value Based Management (VBM) programme to align decision making at all levels in the organisation with the interests of its shareholders. Under the umbrella of this VBM programme the Bank introduced a new approach to identifying and effectively managing its high-value customers. The case shows how the new customer value measurement tool had a significant impact on managerial decision making and how it was supported by value-based sales incentives. The purpose of the case is to provide an illustration of customer profitability analysis in the context of a 'managing for value' initiative at a leading European bank. The case shows how the Bank's external financial goal of top quartile shareholder return was translated into an internal focus on economic profit, which in turn was cascaded to the front line through value-based sales targets. The objective of the case discussion is to explore the benefits and challenges of adopting a value-aligned performance measurement tool to help the salesforce identify high-value customers and take action to boost customer profitability and create shareholder value.
    • Epilogue German Cooperative Bank Berlin

      Verweire, Kurt; De Grande, Jonathan; Letens, Geert; Slagmulder, Regine (2011)
      This is part of a case series. The GCB Berlin cases describe a strategic transformation process of a German bank. Over a period of 3 years, GCB Berlin has transformed into a customer-intimate financial institution. The management team of the company used Strategy Mapping, the Balanced Scorecard, and a new sales-and-service approach as transformation tools to get the entire organization more strategy-focused. The (A) case, 'Bringing German Cooperative Bank Berlin back on track: Can a rural bank thrive in the city?,' sets the scene and describes the challenges Arthur Berthold faced when he entered as a newly appointed director. The (A) case provides more information on the personal background of Arthur Berthold, and on his track record with previous employers. Furthermore, the case describes German Cooperative Bank (GCB) Berlin, a subsidiary of the German Cooperative Banking Group. After working some weeks in this new organization, Arthur detected fundamental financial and cultural problems. He decided to tackle the challenges by launching a Balanced Scorecard project, but was struggling how to do it. Should he opt for a top-down approach, or is a bottom-up approach more appropriate? The case, 'German Cooperative Bank Berlin (B): Managing people, customers, and financial results,' describes the start of the change process at GCB Berlin. The (B) case describes how Arthur Berthold transformed GCB Berlin from an undifferentiated and unprofitable bank into a real customer-oriented, profitable financial institution. The top management team launched two strategy maps, one for the Retail Division and one for the Corporate Division. The (B) case describes how the strategy maps were introduced and what were the effects on the management culture and the operations of the organization. The (B) case also describes a change in the sales-and-service culture within the Retail Division through the introduction of the Cohen Brown program.
    • German Cooperative Bank Berlin (B): Managing people, customers, and financial results

      Verweire, Kurt; De Grande, Jonathan; Letens, Geert; Slagmulder, Regine (2011)
      This is part of a case series. The GCB Berlin cases describe a strategic transformation process of a German bank. Over a period of 3 years, GCB Berlin has transformed into a customer-intimate financial institution. The management team of the company used Strategy Mapping, the Balanced Scorecard, and a new sales-and-service approach as transformation tools to get the entire organization more strategy-focused. The (A) case, 'Bringing German Cooperative Bank Berlin back on track: Can a rural bank thrive in the city?,' sets the scene and describes the challenges Arthur Berthold faced when he entered as a newly appointed director. The (A) case provides more information on the personal background of Arthur Berthold, and on his track record with previous employers. Furthermore, the case describes German Cooperative Bank (GCB) Berlin, a subsidiary of the German Cooperative Banking Group. After working some weeks in this new organization, Arthur detected fundamental financial and cultural problems. He decided to tackle the challenges by launching a Balanced Scorecard project, but was struggling how to do it. Should he opt for a top-down approach, or is a bottom-up approach more appropriate? The case, 'German Cooperative Bank Berlin (B): Managing people, customers, and financial results,' describes the start of the change process at GCB Berlin. The (B) case describes how Arthur Berthold transformed GCB Berlin from an undifferentiated and unprofitable bank into a real customer-oriented, profitable financial institution. The top management team launched two strategy maps, one for the Retail Division and one for the Corporate Division. The (B) case describes how the strategy maps were introduced and what were the effects on the management culture and the operations of the organization. The (B) case also describes a change in the sales-and-service culture within the Retail Division through the introduction of the Cohen Brown program.
    • German Cooperative Bank Berlin (C): Turning the bank into a performance-oriented organization

      Verweire, Kurt; De Grande, Jonathan; Letens, Geert; Slagmulder, Regine (2011)
      This is part of a case series. The GCB Berlin cases describe a strategic transformation process of a German bank. Over a period of 3 years, GCB Berlin has transformed into a customer-intimate financial institution. The management team of the company used Strategy Mapping, the Balanced Scorecard, and a new sales-and-service approach as transformation tools to get the entire organization more strategy-focused. The (A) case, 'Bringing German Cooperative Bank Berlin back on track: Can a rural bank thrive in the city?,' sets the scene and describes the challenges Arthur Berthold faced when he entered as a newly appointed director. The (A) case provides more information on the personal background of Arthur Berthold, and on his track record with previous employers. Furthermore, the case describes German Cooperative Bank (GCB) Berlin, a subsidiary of the German Cooperative Banking Group. After working some weeks in this new organization, Arthur detected fundamental financial and cultural problems. He decided to tackle the challenges by launching a Balanced Scorecard project, but was struggling how to do it. Should he opt for a top-down approach, or is a bottom-up approach more appropriate? The case, 'German Cooperative Bank Berlin (B): Managing people, customers, and financial results,' describes the start of the change process at GCB Berlin. The (B) case describes how Arthur Berthold transformed GCB Berlin from an undifferentiated and unprofitable bank into a real customer-oriented, profitable financial institution. The top management team launched two strategy maps, one for the Retail Division and one for the Corporate Division. The (B) case describes how the strategy maps were introduced and what were the effects on the management culture and the operations of the organization. The (B) case also describes a change in the sales-and-service culture within the Retail Division through the introduction of the Cohen Brown program.
    • Hello Bank. The birth of a mobile Bank

      Muylle, Steve; Viaene, Stijn (2015)
    • ING Direct USA (B). Teaching Note

      Thibeault, André; Verweire, Kurt (2013)
      Teaching note
    • ING Direct USA: Asset or liability for ING Group?

      Thibeault, André; Verweire, Kurt (2013)
      ING Direct USA reinvented banking in the States and in the process rose from a crowd of over 12.000 banks to become one of the 30 largest banks by assets and deposits in the States. Since its inception in 2000, more than 7.7 million Americans have entrusted their savings with ING Direct USA. The company revolutionalised the American retail banking industry with a simple savings bank model, built around the customer. Nevertheless, the company faced a tough period during the financial crisis. What went wrong? Has ING Direct been able to recover? The case study examines why ING Direct USA had serious financial problems and examines the viability of the company's business and financial model. Unlike many other organizations, banks not only need to have a sound commercial and organisational model, they also need to have a sound financial model. Banks that do well on the commercial and organisational strategy dimension do not necessarily perform well financially.
    • ING direct: Rebel in the banking industry

      Verweire, Kurt; Van den Berghe, Lutgart (2006)
      ING DIRECT is one of the six business lines of integrated financial services provider ING Group and active in 9 different countries. The case describes how ING DIRECT USA has become the largest Internet-based bank in the United States, and one of the thirty largest banks of any sort in the country. In particular attention is paid to the strategic positioning of ING DIRECT in the US retail banking industry, and what strategic actions the bank has undertaken to achieve and maintain the unique position the bank has achieved so far. The case depicts how it all started, but also sheds a light on the future challenges of the company. Key Words Strategy, strategic positioning, strategy formulation, strategy implementation, US banking industry, on-line banking
    • ING direct: Rebel in the banking industry - Teaching Note

      Verweire, Kurt; Van den Berghe, Lutgart (2006)
      ING DIRECT is one of the six business lines of integrated financial services provider ING Group and active in 9 different countries. The case describes how ING DIRECT USA has become the largest Internet-based bank in the United States, and one of the thirty largest banks of any sort in the country. In particular attention is paid to the strategic positioning of ING DIRECT in the US retail banking industry, and what strategic actions the bank has undertaken to achieve and maintain the unique position the bank has achieved so far. The case depicts how it all started, but also sheds a light on the future challenges of the company. Key Words Strategy, strategic positioning, strategy formulation, strategy implementation, US banking industry, on-line banking
    • Interpolis: Becoming the most transparent and trustworthy insurance company

      Verweire, Kurt; Kemperman, Jeroen; Op 't Hoog, Jennifer; Maas, Peter (2016)
    • KBC's digital transformation: a cultural and people change (B)

      Verweire, Kurt; Viaene, Stijn; De Prins, Peter (2017)
      This is part of a case series. We follow Erik Luts, the responsible for Direct Channels at KBC Belgium. Together with Daniel Falque, CEO of KBC Belgium, and Johan Lema, Senior General Manager Customer Support Retail & Businesses, he has been working to get KBC ready for the digital age. They are leading an organisation-wide transformation to an omni-channel and customer-centric bank and insurance group, relying on new approaches to digitisation. Although the company has made significant progress with the execution of its strategy, there are still significant hurdles to be taken. One of the major hurdles is gaining acceptance of the strategy in the branches, still the main channel of the bank in Belgium.
    • KBC's digital transformation: a strategic response (A)

      Verweire, Kurt; Viaene, Stijn; De Prins, Peter (2017)
      This is part of a case series. We follow Erik Luts, the responsible for Direct Channels at KBC Belgium. Together with Daniel Falque, CEO of KBC Belgium, and Johan Lema, Senior General Manager Customer Support Retail & Businesses, he has been working to get KBC ready for the digital age. They are leading an organisation-wide transformation to an omni-channel and customer-centric bank and insurance group, relying on new approaches to digitisation. Although the company has made significant progress with the execution of its strategy, there are still significant hurdles to be taken. One of the major hurdles is gaining acceptance of the strategy in the branches, still the main channel of the bank in Belgium.
    • Marketing's business transformation at ING Belgium Retail

      Viaene, Stijn; Van den Bunder, Annabel (2011)
      In 2007, ING Belgium Retail changed its position in the mass retail market to become Belgium's first universal direct bank in a predominantly branch-based market. The fourth largest bank in the Belgian market at the time, ING Belgium Retail continued serving all banking customers with a wide range of financial products, but the bank adopted a new distribution model: 'Direct if possible, advice when needed'. Simple product sales would be migrated to direct channels as much as possible, and the branch network would be restructured to include fewer - but more efficient - branches. This would give the remaining branch staff more time for selling and providing more effective advice. Successful lift-off of the new business model hinged on transforming the Marketing department into a well-oiled machine capable of generating significant on-line traffic and providing more qualified leads to the branches. This case presents the approach taken by ING Belgium's Marketing department to build operational and analytical competency with the ambition of playing a leading role in the strategic transformation of the business. Students are invited to evaluate the bank's achievements up to the time this case was written and to discuss the issues and challenges facing this ambitious Marketing department.
    • Rabobank Nederland

      Gouka, P.T.; Sprokholt, E.; Thibeault, André (Nyenrode Business Universiteit, 1996)