• Belgacom's Acquisition of Telindus: A One-Way Love Affair (A)

      Verweire, Kurt; Greef, Ghita; De Buyst, Didier (2009)
      This is the first of a two-case series (309-068-1 and 309-069-1). The Belgacom-Telindus cases revolve around corporate strategy and in particular the decision of the corporate parent to grow and expand the company via an acquisition. They lead the student through the dynamics of an acquisition and serve to highlight the different strategic decisions involved before, during and after such a deal. Case (A) covers the pre-deal phase and looks at the strategic rationale, strategic fit and potential synergies. It recounts the unsolicited bid by the Belgian telecommunications operator, Belgacom, for an international information and communications technologies (ICT) network integrator, Telindus, in a highly volatile and consolidating ICT industry. With its traditional core business under threat from new technologies, such as mobile telephony, the profitable Belgacom looks to acquire an integrator that will ensure that its top client base is secured, and possibly assist to better position Belgacom to offer corporate clients advanced communication and network solutions in the future. Due to the hostile nature of the bid, Telindus is shocked and swiftly starts talks with long-term business partner France Telecom. When France Telecom makes a counterbid for Telindus, the nature of the acquisition changes drastically for Belgacom. Belgacom decides to react swiftly and launches a higher bid. One week later, the company reports it has over 90 percent of Telindus shares. Telindus is now part of the Belgacom Group. Case (B) delves into the post-deal phase and the chosen and implemented integration approach, as well as the organisational and cultural fit between the two organisations.
    • Belgacom's Acquisition of Telindus: Managing a Marriage of Convenience (B)

      Verweire, Kurt; Greef, Ghita; De Buyst, Didier (2009)
      This is the second of a two-case series (309-068-1 and 309-069-1). The Belgacom-Telindus cases revolve around corporate strategy and in particular the decision of the corporate parent to grow and expand the company via an acquisition. They lead the student through the dynamics of an acquisition and serve to highlight the different strategic decisions involved before, during and after such a deal. Case (A) covers the pre-deal phase and looks at the strategic rationale, strategic fit and potential synergies. It recounts the unsolicited bid by the Belgian telecommunications operator, Belgacom, for an international information and communications technologies (ICT) network integrator, Telindus, in a highly volatile and consolidating ICT industry. With its traditional core business under threat from new technologies, such as mobile telephony, the profitable Belgacom looks to acquire an integrator that will ensure that its top client base is secured, and possibly assist to better position Belgacom to offer corporate clients advanced communication and network solutions in the future. Due to the hostile nature of the bid, Telindus is shocked and swiftly starts talks with long-term business partner France Telecom. When France Telecom makes a counterbid for Telindus, the nature of the acquisition changes drastically for Belgacom. Belgacom decides to react swiftly and launches a higher bid. One week later, the company reports it has over 90 percent of Telindus shares. Telindus is now part of the Belgacom Group. Case (B) delves into the post-deal phase and the chosen and implemented integration approach, as well as the organisational and cultural fit between the two organisations.
    • Bringing German Cooperative Bank Berlin back on track: Can a rural bank thrive in the city? (A)

      Verweire, Kurt; De Grande, Jonathan; Letens, Geert; Slagmulder, Regine (2011)
      This is part of a case series. The GCB Berlin cases describe a strategic transformation process of a German bank. Over a period of 3 years, GCB Berlin has transformed into a customer-intimate financial institution. The management team of the company used Strategy Mapping, the Balanced Scorecard, and a new sales-and-service approach as transformation tools to get the entire organization more strategy-focused. The (A) case, 'Bringing German Cooperative Bank Berlin back on track: Can a rural bank thrive in the city?,' sets the scene and describes the challenges Arthur Berthold faced when he entered as a newly appointed director. The (A) case provides more information on the personal background of Arthur Berthold, and on his track record with previous employers. Furthermore, the case describes German Cooperative Bank (GCB) Berlin, a subsidiary of the German Cooperative Banking Group. After working some weeks in this new organization, Arthur detected fundamental financial and cultural problems. He decided to tackle the challenges by launching a Balanced Scorecard project, but was struggling how to do it. Should he opt for a top-down approach, or is a bottom-up approach more appropriate? The case, 'German Cooperative Bank Berlin (B): Managing people, customers, and financial results,' describes the start of the change process at GCB Berlin. The (B) case describes how Arthur Berthold transformed GCB Berlin from an undifferentiated and unprofitable bank into a real customer-oriented, profitable financial institution. The top management team launched two strategy maps, one for the Retail Division and one for the Corporate Division. The (B) case describes how the strategy maps were introduced and what were the effects on the management culture and the operations of the organization. The (B) case also describes a change in the sales-and-service culture within the Retail Division through the introduction of the Cohen Brown program.
    • Competitive advantage of nations: The Belgian Case

      Vanhaverbeke, Wim (2000)
      This note accompanies the case series 'The Tufted Carpets Industry in Belgium' (300-094-1 and 300-095-1). The abstract for the case is as follows: This case study focuses on the international competitiveness of the Belgian tufted carpet industry. The case study is an illustration of the theory developed by Porter in his book 'The Competitive Advantage of Nations'. Belgian manufacturers became the most competitive carpet producers in the EU during the 1980s due to their production flexibility, which was supported by flat organisational structures. Due to the relatively small domestic market, companies were forced early on to export in different neighbouring countries. The small domestic market was an initial selective disadvantage that has been changed into a competitive advantage, as Belgian manufacturers were very flexible in serving export markets with different tastes. The large throughput allowed them, in turn, to invest heavily in state-of-the-art technology bringing down unit production costs. At the end of the 80s, the industry observers fear stagnation and price wars as customers discover substituting floor coverings. New export markets should offer relief. The (B) case updates the Belgian carpet industry for 1999, reviewing the changes in the competitive environment in the last seven years.
    • Cowboys to Gentlemen: Doing Business in Central Europe

      Bowen, Harry; De Voldere, Isabelle (2006)
      After 10 years of doing business in the Polish commercial real estate market, Liebrecht & wooD contemplates the changes in the competitive environment during the last few years. The market has evolved from a high-risk emerging market to a maturing market with increasingly fierce competition that has signicantly reduced Liebrecht & wooD's return on investment. Amid these changes, Liebrecht & wooD faces several challenges: (1) what strategies should the company adopt to respond to growing competition and a maturing commercial real estate market in Poland?, and (2) can Liebrecht & wooD continue to offer high return / high risk projects to its core investors? The case asks participants to think about the dynamics of a maturing market and the different options a company has to maintain a competitive position in such a maturing market. It also provides important insight into the opportunities and risks of doing business in Central Europe. The case is well suited for courses dealing with international business and internationalisation strategy. The case encompasses a number of strategic methods and issues including: (1) industry analysis, (2) strategic positioning, (3) product and geographic scope, and (4) organisational structure. The case can be used with students at any level, including those in general management, MBA, and executive programmes.
    • Deloitte's Merger with Andersen in Belgium: A Better Organization for the Ones to Follow (B)

      Greef, Ghita; Verweire, Kurt (2009)
      This is the second of a two-case series (310-025-1 to 310-026-1). The Deloitte-Andersen cases describe a successful merger between two big professional service firms, Deloitte and Andersen in Belgium. The cases lead the student through the dynamics of a merger of equals and serve to highlight the different strategic decisions involved before, during and after such a deal. The (A) case covers the pre-deal phase and the first year of the integration. After the Enron scandal, Andersen Belgium has to ally with one of the competitors to survive. In Belgium, Andersen has chosen to merge with Deloitte. The case illustrates how and why Andersen and Deloitte have chosen a merger of equals. Furthermore, the (A) case describes the first integration steps the different business units have taken in the year following the merger. The (A) case ends with some challenges the top management team has to tackle. Deloitte has addressed these challenges fast and well. The (B) case describes how managers in the business units and at the corporate center have dealt with the integration challenges over the period 2003-08. Overall, the merger has been a huge success and Deloitte is now an indisputable market leader in Belgium in audit, tax, consulting, accountancy, and corporate finance. The (B) case delves into the post-deal phase and outlines the chosen integration approach. The case is interesting because it addresses how the managers of the new company have tried to achieve organisational and cultural fit in a merger of equals.
    • Deloitte's Merger with Andersen in Belgium: Exploring the Process of Integration (A)

      Greef, Ghita; Verweire, Kurt (2009)
      This is the first of a two-case series (310-025-1 to 310-026-1). The Deloitte-Andersen cases describe a successful merger between two big professional service firms, Deloitte and Andersen in Belgium. The cases lead the student through the dynamics of a merger of equals and serve to highlight the different strategic decisions involved before, during and after such a deal. The (A) case covers the pre-deal phase and the first year of the integration. After the Enron scandal, Andersen Belgium has to ally with one of the competitors to survive. In Belgium, Andersen has chosen to merge with Deloitte. The case illustrates how and why Andersen and Deloitte have chosen a merger of equals. Furthermore, the (A) case describes the first integration steps the different business units have taken in the year following the merger. The (A) case ends with some challenges the top management team has to tackle. Deloitte has addressed these challenges fast and well. The (B) case describes how managers in the business units and at the corporate center have dealt with the integration challenges over the period 2003-08. Overall, the merger has been a huge success and Deloitte is now an indisputable market leader in Belgium in audit, tax, consulting, accountancy, and corporate finance. The (B) case delves into the post-deal phase and outlines the chosen integration approach. The case is interesting because it addresses how the managers of the new company have tried to achieve organisational and cultural fit in a merger of equals.
    • Developing a Smart Meter Sourcing Strategy at Eandis

      Varganova, Olga; Samii, Behzad (2017)
    • Epilogue German Cooperative Bank Berlin

      Verweire, Kurt; De Grande, Jonathan; Letens, Geert; Slagmulder, Regine (2011)
      This is part of a case series. The GCB Berlin cases describe a strategic transformation process of a German bank. Over a period of 3 years, GCB Berlin has transformed into a customer-intimate financial institution. The management team of the company used Strategy Mapping, the Balanced Scorecard, and a new sales-and-service approach as transformation tools to get the entire organization more strategy-focused. The (A) case, 'Bringing German Cooperative Bank Berlin back on track: Can a rural bank thrive in the city?,' sets the scene and describes the challenges Arthur Berthold faced when he entered as a newly appointed director. The (A) case provides more information on the personal background of Arthur Berthold, and on his track record with previous employers. Furthermore, the case describes German Cooperative Bank (GCB) Berlin, a subsidiary of the German Cooperative Banking Group. After working some weeks in this new organization, Arthur detected fundamental financial and cultural problems. He decided to tackle the challenges by launching a Balanced Scorecard project, but was struggling how to do it. Should he opt for a top-down approach, or is a bottom-up approach more appropriate? The case, 'German Cooperative Bank Berlin (B): Managing people, customers, and financial results,' describes the start of the change process at GCB Berlin. The (B) case describes how Arthur Berthold transformed GCB Berlin from an undifferentiated and unprofitable bank into a real customer-oriented, profitable financial institution. The top management team launched two strategy maps, one for the Retail Division and one for the Corporate Division. The (B) case describes how the strategy maps were introduced and what were the effects on the management culture and the operations of the organization. The (B) case also describes a change in the sales-and-service culture within the Retail Division through the introduction of the Cohen Brown program.
    • Fortis Yacht Services (A)

      Debruyne, Marion; Verweire, Kurt (2007)
      This is the first of a two-case series (308-038-1 and 308-039-1). The cases serve to illustrate innovation within large established companies. It can be used to discuss (business model) innovation in service industries. It is best used within executive programmes in the financial services industry, or in a session on innovation or venturing, or when the topic of business model innovation has been discussed. Fortis Yacht Services is also a nice example of a Blue Ocean Strategy. The (A) case presents a proposal for a new venture within Fortis, a leading Benelux financial services provider. The setting of the case is a presentation by Pascal De Wert for the Fortis Innovation Board. Pascal De Wert is a Branch Manager for Fortis. He spends his leisure time in the yachting world and this has given him the idea for Fortis Yacht Services. Offering financing and insurance services for leisure yachts, Fortis Yachting Services would be the hub for customers considering the option of purchasing a yacht. The Fortis Innovation Board needs to decide whether the approval will be given to go ahead with Fortis Yacht Services. The (B) case ends with how to develop Fortis Yacht Services further. Should it be kept separate and grow further as part of Fortis Venturing? Or should it be brought back to the traditional business lines, and hence fly away from under mother's wings?
    • Fortis Yacht Services (B): Flying away from under mother's wings?

      Debruyne, Marion; Verweire, Kurt (2007)
      This is the second of a two-case series (308-038-1 and 308-039-1). The cases serve to illustrate innovation within large established companies. It can be used to discuss (business model) innovation in service industries. It is best used within executive programmes in the financial services industry, or in a session on innovation or venturing, or when the topic of business model innovation has been discussed. Fortis Yacht Services is also a nice example of a Blue Ocean Strategy. The (A) case presents a proposal for a new venture within Fortis, a leading Benelux financial services provider. The setting of the case is a presentation by Pascal De Wert for the Fortis Innovation Board. Pascal De Wert is a Branch Manager for Fortis. He spends his leisure time in the yachting world and this has given him the idea for Fortis Yacht Services. Offering financing and insurance services for leisure yachts, Fortis Yachting Services would be the hub for customers considering the option of purchasing a yacht. The Fortis Innovation Board needs to decide whether the approval will be given to go ahead with Fortis Yacht Services.The (B) case ends with how to develop Fortis Yacht Services further. Should it be kept separate and grow further as part of Fortis Venturing? Or should it be brought back to the traditional business lines, and hence fly away from under mother's wings?
    • German Cooperative Bank Berlin (B): Managing people, customers, and financial results

      Verweire, Kurt; De Grande, Jonathan; Letens, Geert; Slagmulder, Regine (2011)
      This is part of a case series. The GCB Berlin cases describe a strategic transformation process of a German bank. Over a period of 3 years, GCB Berlin has transformed into a customer-intimate financial institution. The management team of the company used Strategy Mapping, the Balanced Scorecard, and a new sales-and-service approach as transformation tools to get the entire organization more strategy-focused. The (A) case, 'Bringing German Cooperative Bank Berlin back on track: Can a rural bank thrive in the city?,' sets the scene and describes the challenges Arthur Berthold faced when he entered as a newly appointed director. The (A) case provides more information on the personal background of Arthur Berthold, and on his track record with previous employers. Furthermore, the case describes German Cooperative Bank (GCB) Berlin, a subsidiary of the German Cooperative Banking Group. After working some weeks in this new organization, Arthur detected fundamental financial and cultural problems. He decided to tackle the challenges by launching a Balanced Scorecard project, but was struggling how to do it. Should he opt for a top-down approach, or is a bottom-up approach more appropriate? The case, 'German Cooperative Bank Berlin (B): Managing people, customers, and financial results,' describes the start of the change process at GCB Berlin. The (B) case describes how Arthur Berthold transformed GCB Berlin from an undifferentiated and unprofitable bank into a real customer-oriented, profitable financial institution. The top management team launched two strategy maps, one for the Retail Division and one for the Corporate Division. The (B) case describes how the strategy maps were introduced and what were the effects on the management culture and the operations of the organization. The (B) case also describes a change in the sales-and-service culture within the Retail Division through the introduction of the Cohen Brown program.
    • German Cooperative Bank Berlin (C): Turning the bank into a performance-oriented organization

      Verweire, Kurt; De Grande, Jonathan; Letens, Geert; Slagmulder, Regine (2011)
      This is part of a case series. The GCB Berlin cases describe a strategic transformation process of a German bank. Over a period of 3 years, GCB Berlin has transformed into a customer-intimate financial institution. The management team of the company used Strategy Mapping, the Balanced Scorecard, and a new sales-and-service approach as transformation tools to get the entire organization more strategy-focused. The (A) case, 'Bringing German Cooperative Bank Berlin back on track: Can a rural bank thrive in the city?,' sets the scene and describes the challenges Arthur Berthold faced when he entered as a newly appointed director. The (A) case provides more information on the personal background of Arthur Berthold, and on his track record with previous employers. Furthermore, the case describes German Cooperative Bank (GCB) Berlin, a subsidiary of the German Cooperative Banking Group. After working some weeks in this new organization, Arthur detected fundamental financial and cultural problems. He decided to tackle the challenges by launching a Balanced Scorecard project, but was struggling how to do it. Should he opt for a top-down approach, or is a bottom-up approach more appropriate? The case, 'German Cooperative Bank Berlin (B): Managing people, customers, and financial results,' describes the start of the change process at GCB Berlin. The (B) case describes how Arthur Berthold transformed GCB Berlin from an undifferentiated and unprofitable bank into a real customer-oriented, profitable financial institution. The top management team launched two strategy maps, one for the Retail Division and one for the Corporate Division. The (B) case describes how the strategy maps were introduced and what were the effects on the management culture and the operations of the organization. The (B) case also describes a change in the sales-and-service culture within the Retail Division through the introduction of the Cohen Brown program.
    • Imec (A): creating value through a new approach to IPR Management

      Chesbrough, Henry; Vanhaverbeke, Wim (2008)
      This is the first of a two-case series (308-225-1 and 308-226-1). IMEC - a successful Belgian research institute in nano-electronics - represents an innovative and successful open innovation response to the growing challenges of technology innovation in the semiconductor industry. IMEC offers a creative public-private partnership approach to pursue new generation technologies, with the support of both public funds and industry membership funds.There are several issues that can be pursued through this case. How public and private sources of research funding work in practice? How academic research goals do or do not comport with industry research goals? How industrial research is organised in a capital intensive, rapidly advancing industry? The role that intellectual property can play in catalysing advanced research within an open innovation model? The role of business models, and how they enable and constrain research? The case shows how IMEC is confronted by an investment decision that is on an entirely different scale from anything undertaken before: whether or not to raise and invest more than US$1 billion to upgrade its facilities and equipment to research 300mm wafer semiconductor technology research. This particular setting opens up broader questions about IMEC's existing business model, its open intellectual property rights model, etc In this sense, this decision will force both the strengths and the limits of the IMEC model into the open.
    • Imec (B): Creating value through a new approach to IPR Management

      Odusanya, Lola; Chesbrough, Henry; Vanhaverbeke, Wim (2008)
      This is the second of a two-case series (308-225-1 and 308-226-1). IMEC - a successful Belgian research institute in nano-electronics - represents an innovative and successful open innovation response to the growing challenges of technology innovation in the semiconductor industry. IMEC offers a creative public-private partnership approach to pursue new generation technologies, with the support of both public funds and industry membership funds.There are several issues that can be pursued through this case. How public and private sources of research funding work in practice? How academic research goals do or do not comport with industry research goals? How industrial research is organised in a capital intensive, rapidly advancing industry? The role that intellectual property can play in catalysing advanced research within an open innovation model? The role of business models, and how they enable and constrain research? The case shows how IMEC is confronted by an investment decision that is on an entirely different scale from anything undertaken before: whether or not to raise and invest more than US$1 billion to upgrade its facilities and equipment to research 300mm wafer semiconductor technology research. This particular setting opens up broader questions about IMEC's existing business model, its open intellectual property rights model, etc In this sense, this decision will force both the strengths and the limits of the IMEC model into the open.
    • ING Direct USA (B). Teaching Note

      Thibeault, André; Verweire, Kurt (2013)
      Teaching note