• 3M Automotive Aftermarket Division

      Muylle, Steve; Rangarajan, Deva; Dom, Alfons (2007)
      This case highlights the various factors that affect how an organisation moves from a product focused approach to a solution-based approach. The case incorporates the process change involved in this transition, and in particular focuses on the changes in customer orientation, the corresponding value proposition, and the underlying value network. These objectives are accomplished by illustrating the 3M AAD (Automotive Aftermarket Division) situation over time, as structured in parts (A), (B) and (C). The teaching note provides discussion questions that follow each part and form a link to the following part.
    • 3M Automotive Aftermarket Division - Teaching note

      Muylle, Steve; Rangarajan, Deva; Dom, Alfons (2007)
    • A 60 second clip to create change: palm oil role play (round 1)

      Roome (+), Nigel; Louche, Céline (2014)
      On March 17, 2010, Greenpeace launched a new campaign against the conversion of tropical rainforest to industrial palm oil plantations. The campaign directly attacked Nestle because its supply-chain included palm oil from alleged unsustainable sources. The campaign began with a 60 second video clip. Although Nestle was directly targeted by the campaign, other actors such as companies in the same sector, the suppliers and marketers of palm oil, and NGOs protecting the rainforest were also affected. The video went viral within a few days and Greenpeace followed up with other actions. The case is set up as a role play in two rounds. In round 1, students are invited to consider how the Greenpeace campaign might affect each of a set of five actors (but not Nestle). The five actors present their responses to the campaign and this provides a context to round 2. In round 2, students take on the role of managers at Nestle who have to decide what the company should do next. This role play is about better understanding the impact of organisations on society in a dynamic context shaped by the unfolding positions and actions of a number of organisations. It involves comprehending organisations and their actions in a more systemic perspective than usual; seizing on the complexity and context dependent nature of sustainability. At the same time the case introduces the phenomenon of targeted social activism; and the question of change not only by an organisation but also at the field level. The case study can also be used to critically assess the value of a range of management concepts such as stakeholder theory and creating shared value as well as exploring the business contribution to sustainable development in developed and developing countries.
    • A 60 second clip to create change: palm oil role play (round 2)

      Roome (+), Nigel; Louche, Céline (2014)
      On March 17, 2010, Greenpeace launched a new campaign against the conversion of tropical rainforest to industrial palm oil plantations. The campaign directly attacked Nestle because its supply-chain included palm oil from alleged unsustainable sources. The campaign began with a 60 second video clip. Although Nestle was directly targeted by the campaign, other actors such as companies in the same sector, the suppliers and marketers of palm oil, and NGOs protecting the rainforest were also affected. The video went viral within a few days and Greenpeace followed up with other actions. The case is set up as a role play in two rounds. In round 1, students are invited to consider how the Greenpeace campaign might affect each of a set of five actors (but not Nestle). The five actors present their responses to the campaign and this provides a context to round 2. In round 2, students take on the role of managers at Nestle who have to decide what the company should do next. This role play is about better understanding the impact of organisations on society in a dynamic context shaped by the unfolding positions and actions of a number of organisations. It involves comprehending organisations and their actions in a more systemic perspective than usual; seizing on the complexity and context dependent nature of sustainability. At the same time the case introduces the phenomenon of targeted social activism; and the question of change not only by an organisation but also at the field level. The case study can also be used to critically assess the value of a range of management concepts such as stakeholder theory and creating shared value as well as exploring the business contribution to sustainable development in developed and developing countries.
    • A case study of Arteconomy - Building a bridge between art and enterprise: Flemish businesses stimulate creativity and innovation through art

      Van den Broeck, Herman; Cools, Eva; Maenhout, Tine (2008)
      In a world where there has long since been more at play than functionality and cost price, we need creative innovation more than ever before. Organisations are trying to find ways to embed more creativity, more innovative potential and more entrepreneurship into the everyday running of their businesses. They are constantly in search of effective ways to make their organisation's culture better equipped for change. The Flemish non-profit organisation Arteconomy has developed a method for doing this, by bringing businesspeople and artists together in a series of particularly unique projects. In this case study, you can read about the philosophy that give rise to Arteconomy and the pioneering work that preceded it. The case describes two specific projects that provide a concrete illustration of the arteconomy approach in two Belgian textile firms: 'The Dragon of Deerlijk' at Promo Fashion and 'The Walk' at Concordia Textiles. The case study, and more specifically Arteconomy's approach, provides relevant material for discussion with students (level: Masters and MBA) and managers (in the context of executive business programmes) on: (1) change as an organisational process, and (2) how to stimulate employees' creative skills.
    • Access blocking at Ghent University Hospital

      Gemmel, Paul; De Raedt, Lieven (2009)
      In the summer of 2006, some conflicts arose between the emergency department (ED) and some of the internal nursing departments (INDs) of Ghent University Hospital. The ED staff did not understand why the CEO had communicated a message about the low occupancy rate of the beds in the hospital, because he had been confronted for some years with the phenomenon of access blocking in the ED. Furthermore, the ED staff had evidence of the fact that the access of patients from the ED to the INDs was being blocked even though there were free beds in these nursing departments. As a consequence, the ED regularly became overcrowded, which led to an unacceptable workload for the ED staff. Therefore, the CEO and the hospital's chief of medicine invited Dr Paul De Meester - Professor of Health Care Management - to discuss the matter. Dr De Meester understood that this issue was not only an 'ED' problem, but a complex hospital-wide problem. Nevertheless, Dr De Meester was asked to come up with a solution. Fortunately, a lot of data had been gathered, which allowed Paul De Meester to make several well-founded recommendations.
    • Alliander: Power to the people (A)

      Debruyne, Marion; Meeus, Leonardo; Hadush, Samson Yemane (2017)
      This is part of a case series. The aim of this three part teaching case is to stimulate discussion on how companies can adopt new business models to survive sector-wide transitions by taking the perspective of energy network companies which often operate under a highly regulated environment.
    • Alliander: Power to the people (B)

      Debruyne, Marion; Meeus, Leonardo; Hadush, Samson Yemane (2017)
      This is part of a case series. The aim of this three part teaching case is to stimulate discussion on how companies can adopt new business models to survive sector-wide transitions by taking the perspective of energy network companies which often operate under a highly regulated environment.
    • Alliander: Power to the people (C)

      Debruyne, Marion; Meeus, Leonardo; Hadush, Samson Yemane (2017)
      This is part of a case series. The aim of this three part teaching case is to stimulate discussion on how companies can adopt new business models to survive sector-wide transitions by taking the perspective of energy network companies which often operate under a highly regulated environment.
    • Analyzing the financial statements of the world's largest retailer: Wal-Mart

      De Maeseneire, Wouter; Luypaert, Mathieu (2010)
      This case is intended for an introductory or main course on Financial Statement Analysis. It may also be useful within a Corporate Finance / Financial Management course. After a class on financial statements and liquidity, profitability and solvency ratios - and some brief examples discussed by the lecturer - students should be capable of making a financial analysis of Wal-Mart. Students can be asked to make this analysis in class, or to prepare the case outside the classroom, and to present it. Ideally, the case work is conducted in groups of 4 to 6 students, and it typically takes between 1 to 1.5 hours (for the analysis itself - obviously, drafting a written report or presentation is more time consuming). The Wal-Mart case is aimed at both undergraduate and graduate students, and for general management programmes / MBAs as well as finance students - obviously, for the latter group, a much more fine-grained analysis, extensive discussion and adequate linking among various financials and between the numbers and Wal-Mart's business is required. Evidently, the lecturer should highlight many more details in a class of finance students.
    • Apple: time to think different about cash

      De Maeseneire, Wouter; Maertens, Maxime; Deschepper, Thomas (2013)
    • B-Kay Tech: Horizontal Collaboration in Logistics

      Boute, Robert; Van Steendam, Tom; Creemers, Stefan (2017)
    • Barco: Leading the Events Market

      Muylle, Steve; Debruyne, Marion (2009)
      In 2004, Barco is a leading player in the market for events projection for large and extra large venues. Barco's Events Business Unit is the biggest business unit of the Barco Media and Entertainment Division. Chris Colpaert, Director Product Management is returning from Infocomm, the most important tradeshow for audio visual professionals in the world, and needs to decide which product line decisions to take in response to the competitive developments in the market. As he prepares for a meeting with the Business Unit and Division directors, he is considering four options. The four options represent different innovation strategies.
    • Barco: Manufacturing strategy of printed circuit assembly

      Vereecke, Ann; Goeman, Filip; Serneels, Steven (2006)
      Barco is a multinational active in image processing technology. Four of the business units (BU's) each have a printed circuit assembly (PCA) department, supplying the final assembly plant of the BU. The management of Barco considers merging the printed circuit assembly departments of the four business units. The four business units supply different markets, with different requirements. The case starts by describing the competitive success factors in each of these business units. The final assembly units obviously play a critical role in accomplishing the market requirements for all business units. However, in some of the business units the role of the PCA department is also very critical for competitiveness. This is the second element in the discussion. A third element in the discussion is the performance improvement (or possibly deterioration) that may result from the merger of the PCA departments. The case allows the teacher to go through the decision making for the merger of the PCA departments. While this is mainly a discussion on the manufacturing strategy at the level of the plant and the PCA department, it also offers the possibility to discuss the organisational issues that arise in such a decision, and the potential for outsourcing the PCA. A teaching note supplement is available to accompany the teaching note.
    • Barco: Manufacturing strategy of printed circuit assembly - Teaching Note

      Vereecke, Ann; Goeman, Filip; Serneels, Steven (2006)
    • Belgacom's Acquisition of Telindus: A One-Way Love Affair (A)

      Verweire, Kurt; Greef, Ghita; De Buyst, Didier (2009)
      This is the first of a two-case series (309-068-1 and 309-069-1). The Belgacom-Telindus cases revolve around corporate strategy and in particular the decision of the corporate parent to grow and expand the company via an acquisition. They lead the student through the dynamics of an acquisition and serve to highlight the different strategic decisions involved before, during and after such a deal. Case (A) covers the pre-deal phase and looks at the strategic rationale, strategic fit and potential synergies. It recounts the unsolicited bid by the Belgian telecommunications operator, Belgacom, for an international information and communications technologies (ICT) network integrator, Telindus, in a highly volatile and consolidating ICT industry. With its traditional core business under threat from new technologies, such as mobile telephony, the profitable Belgacom looks to acquire an integrator that will ensure that its top client base is secured, and possibly assist to better position Belgacom to offer corporate clients advanced communication and network solutions in the future. Due to the hostile nature of the bid, Telindus is shocked and swiftly starts talks with long-term business partner France Telecom. When France Telecom makes a counterbid for Telindus, the nature of the acquisition changes drastically for Belgacom. Belgacom decides to react swiftly and launches a higher bid. One week later, the company reports it has over 90 percent of Telindus shares. Telindus is now part of the Belgacom Group. Case (B) delves into the post-deal phase and the chosen and implemented integration approach, as well as the organisational and cultural fit between the two organisations.
    • Belgacom's Acquisition of Telindus: Managing a Marriage of Convenience (B)

      Verweire, Kurt; Greef, Ghita; De Buyst, Didier (2009)
      This is the second of a two-case series (309-068-1 and 309-069-1). The Belgacom-Telindus cases revolve around corporate strategy and in particular the decision of the corporate parent to grow and expand the company via an acquisition. They lead the student through the dynamics of an acquisition and serve to highlight the different strategic decisions involved before, during and after such a deal. Case (A) covers the pre-deal phase and looks at the strategic rationale, strategic fit and potential synergies. It recounts the unsolicited bid by the Belgian telecommunications operator, Belgacom, for an international information and communications technologies (ICT) network integrator, Telindus, in a highly volatile and consolidating ICT industry. With its traditional core business under threat from new technologies, such as mobile telephony, the profitable Belgacom looks to acquire an integrator that will ensure that its top client base is secured, and possibly assist to better position Belgacom to offer corporate clients advanced communication and network solutions in the future. Due to the hostile nature of the bid, Telindus is shocked and swiftly starts talks with long-term business partner France Telecom. When France Telecom makes a counterbid for Telindus, the nature of the acquisition changes drastically for Belgacom. Belgacom decides to react swiftly and launches a higher bid. One week later, the company reports it has over 90 percent of Telindus shares. Telindus is now part of the Belgacom Group. Case (B) delves into the post-deal phase and the chosen and implemented integration approach, as well as the organisational and cultural fit between the two organisations.