• Case Basic Textiles

      Manigart, Sophie (2008)
      On 15 December 2007, Sammy Lasseel was facing an important decision that could change his life, but he had to act quickly. He joined Basic Textiles last year as CEO, with an option to buy the company within the year. The current shareholders have given him an ultimatum: Sammy had the opportunity to buy the company for 4 million euros, but he had to decide before Christmas. If he declined their proposal, he would be fired as CEO as from January 2008 onwards. Sammy first had to decide whether he was willing to pay 4 million euros for the shares. If so, how could he finance the takeover?
    • Case Pizza Hut A: the management buy-out of Pizza Hut Belgium

      De Vriese, Carolien; Manigart, Sophie (2007)
      This is part of a case series. In 2000, Tricon Restaurant, the parent company of Pizza Hut, decided to spin off all its non-strategic businesses, including Pizza Belgium. The CEO of Pizza Belgium, Stef Meulemans, was afraid of the consequences of a trade sale to an international player. He therefore attempted to put together a management buy-out. Stef Meulemans could invest 125,000 euros of his own in the transaction. Although he didn't know yet how the deal would be financed or how much equity would be needed, it was quite likely that a financial partner with additional funds would be needed. The fraction of the shares that Stef Meulemans could acquire would depend on the amount of equity required from the private equity investor and his own negotiation and deal structuring skills.
    • Case Pizza Hut B: the exit of the buy out fund

      De Vriese, Carolien; Manigart, Sophie (2007)
      This is part of a case series. At the end of 2004, about four years after the management buy-out (MBO), the private equity investor Buy Out Fund (BOF) started preparing for the exit. Within two to three years, BOF would sell its Pizza Belgium shares. Stef Meulemans knew that he would probably have to sell his shares too. It could not be excluded that the buyer would install his own management team, and he would definitely not be a shareholder anymore. That was why he seriously considered taking the plunge for the second time. A secondary buy-out would be difficult, but he had no other option if he wanted to remain a shareholder of Pizza Belgium. This time five other managers were eager to join the MBO. Stef was willing to invest the proceeds of the sale of his 15% stake. The other managers could invest 50,000 euros each. Stef and the other managers had to make an interesting offer to BOF. Stef knew they would have to attract a new private equity player, but one thing Stef knew for sure: he wanted to be the majority shareholder.
    • Causes of company failure and failure paths: The rise and fall of a producer of industrial foils and bags

      Ooghe, Hubert; Waeyaert, Nick (2005)
      One of the prevalent concerns in present times, for both management academics and practitioners, relates to the principles which determine corporate success and failure. Although many models discover early symptoms of failure by using financial information, there is a lack of a deeper insight into the real causes of company failure and into the way they influence each other. The symptoms one can discover in the annual accounts are the consequence of a process that generally started long before. This case study of IFoil, once a leading European producer of industrial foils, biodegradable packing materials and bin bags, describes the rise and fall of a firm with an ambitious but risky strategy. This strategy proceeded from a management buy-out in 1996 and ended with a failure in 2003. In the case, we aim to analyse and describe IFoil's causes of failure and failure path in detail.
    • Causes of company failure and failure paths: The rise and fall of a producer of industrial foils and bags - Teaching note

      Ooghe, Hubert; Waeyaert, Nick (2005)
      One of the prevalent concerns in present times, for both management academics and practitioners, relates to the principles which determine corporate success and failure. Although many models discover early symptoms of failure by using financial information, there is a lack of a deeper insight into the real causes of company failure and into the way they influence each other. The symptoms one can discover in the annual accounts are the consequence of a process that generally started long before. This case study of IFoil, once a leading European producer of industrial foils, biodegradable packing materials and bin bags, describes the rise and fall of a firm with an ambitious but risky strategy. This strategy proceeded from a management buy-out in 1996 and ended with a failure in 2003. In the case, we aim to analyse and describe IFoil's causes of failure and failure path in detail.
    • Teaching Note Pizza Hut B: the exit of the buy out fund

      De Vriese, Carolien; Manigart, Sophie (2007)