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dc.contributor.authorFeys, Charlotte
dc.contributor.authorManigart, Sophie
dc.date.accessioned2017-12-02T14:42:25Z
dc.date.available2017-12-02T14:42:25Z
dc.date.issued2010
dc.identifier.isbn9780910897327
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/20.500.12127/4238
dc.description.abstractIn contrast to the Affect Infusion Model, popular advertising planning grids suggest that emotional advertising is effective for low involvement and hedonic products, but not for high involvement or utilitarian products. In two experiments, 400 and 392 consumers respectively evaluate a non-emotional and a product-congruent or product-incongruent emotional appeal promoting four different product types. In a third study, 909 respondents evaluate 323 existing TV commercials. The findings confirm expectations based on the Affect Infusion Model and indicate that for none of the product types negative effects of emotional advertisements appear. However, emotional ads do work better for some than other product types. In addition to clearing out the moderating role of product type, this paper contributes to the literature by showing that previous poorer results of emotional ads for some products may be partly due to less positive attitudes towards the products themselves instead of to the inappropriateness of the appeal.
dc.language.isoen
dc.subjectAccounting & Finance
dc.titleThe post-acquisition performance of acquired entrepreneurial firms
dc.title.alternativeFrontiers of Entrepreneurship Research 2010
dc.source.volume30
dc.source.issue1
vlerick.knowledgedomainAccounting & Finance
vlerick.typebookBook Chapter
vlerick.vlerickdepartmentA&F
dc.identifier.vperid127293
dc.identifier.vperid35884
dc.identifier.vpubid4901


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