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dc.contributor.authorVan den Berghe, Lutgart
dc.contributor.authorLevrau, Abigail
dc.date.accessioned2017-12-02T14:52:41Z
dc.date.available2017-12-02T14:52:41Z
dc.date.issued2013
dc.identifier.isbn9781137275691
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/20.500.12127/4930
dc.description.abstractEmotional advertising is generally believed to be persuasive. However, not all emotional advertising is equally effective. Previous research has illustrated the importance of the pleasure dimension of emotions in the sense that positive emotions usually induce more positive attitudes than negative emotions. This paper deals with another dimension of emotions – the ego-other-focus dimension of emotions – referring to the degree to which these emotions make people see themselves as independent from or interdependent with others in a specific situation. Our findings indicate that, for a privately consumed product, ads evoking an egofocused emotion score better than ads evoking an other-focused emotion, whereas the reverse is true for a publicly consumed product. This match between product and emotion does not matter for introverts, but is important for extravert people. As such, we show that not only the pleasure dimension, but also the ego-other-focus dimension of emotions determines the effectiveness of emotional advertising.
dc.language.isoen
dc.publisherPalgrave
dc.subjectEntrepreneurship
dc.titlePromoting effective board decision-making, the essence of good governance
dc.title.alternativeHow to make boards work - An international overview
dc.source.beginpage211
dc.source.endpage267
vlerick.knowledgedomainEntrepreneurship
vlerick.typebookBook Chapter
vlerick.vlerickdepartmentEGS
dc.identifier.vperid26803
dc.identifier.vperid35906
dc.identifier.vpubid5871


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