• Understanding IT governance success and its impact: Results from an interview study.

      Urbach, Nils; Buchwald, Arne; Ahlemann, Frederik (2013)
      Owing to the increasing regulatory pressure and the need for aligned IT decisions, governance of IT has become important for both academia and practice. However, knowledge that integrates the determinants and consequences of IT governance success remains scarce. Although some studies investigate single aspects of IT governance success and its impact, none of these combine these factors into a comprehensive and integrated model. To address this gap, our research aims at understanding what factors influence and result from successful IT governance, and at determining how they can be translated into a model to explain IT governance success and its impact. Therefore, we conducted 28 interviews in 19 companies across different industries. Based on the analysis, we present a model that helps understanding what factors make IT governance successful and how IT governance contributes to an IT …
    • Understanding the organizational antecedents of bottom-up un-enacted projects - Towards a conceptual model based on deviance theory

      Buchwald, Arne; Urbach, Nils; Ahlemann, Frederik (2014)
      Un-enacted projects are those projects that have not been officially evaluated by the project portfolio management but do exist although they are not known to a company's project portfolio. As a consequence, resources thought to be available often prove to be actually unavailable and that unofficial initiatives eventually compete for scarce resources. One particular type of these un-enacted projects are bottom-up initiatives. Bottom-up un-enacted projects are unofficial initiatives on which employees spend time without order but with which they intend to benefit their organizations. While previous research highlights the great potential of bottom-up un-enacted projects, they only focus on the individual level but leave the organizational level for further research. To address this research gap, this study aims at gaining a deeper understanding of the organizational drivers of bottom-up un-enacted projects. We draw on deviance theory to develop a conceptual model for explaining the occurrence of these projects. In order to triangulate the emerging model with insights from practice, we use interview data to cross-check and refine the theory-driven model. Our results advance the theoretical discourse on the concept of un-enacted projects and enable practitioners to understand the levers with which to steer respective activities in the intended direction.