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dc.contributor.authorBriers, Barbara
dc.contributor.authorLaporte, Sandra
dc.date.accessioned2020-01-13T09:19:07Z
dc.date.available2020-01-13T09:19:07Z
dc.date.issued2010en_US
dc.identifier.issn0098-9258
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/20.500.12127/6427
dc.description.abstractMonetary scarcity and money primes may induce people to desire more calories. This Pavlovian association between money and food appears driven by the instrumental, secondary reinforcer value of money rather than by its primary rewarding qualities: The effect only holds for food choices but does not generalize to nonfood items and is not moderated by individual sensitivity for reward (study 1). The effect also is restricted to persons who adopt an instrumental value of money (study 2). In addition, merely priming people with money can lead to caloric desire, but this effect disappears with monetary satiation (study 3). In line with the value heuristic, people lacking money or those primed with money perceive food items as less caloric because they value calories more. Accordingly, they prefer bigger portions.en_US
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.subjectFood choicesen_US
dc.subjectMonetary Scarcityen_US
dc.titleEmpty pockets full stomachs: How monetary scarcity and monetary primes lead to caloric desireen_US
dc.title.alternativeAdvances in Consumer Researchen_US
dc.source.beginpage837en_US
dc.source.endpage839en_US
dc.contributor.departmentTilburg University, the Netherlandsen_US
dc.contributor.departmentHEC Paris, Franceen_US
vlerick.conferencelocationPittsburgh, Pennsylvaniaen_US
vlerick.conferencenameAdvances of Consumer Researchen_US
vlerick.conferenceorganiserAssocation for Consumer Researchen_US
vlerick.knowledgedomainMarketing & Salesen_US
vlerick.typeconfpresConference Proceedingen_US
vlerick.vlerickdepartmentMKTen_US
dc.identifier.vperid192584en_US


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