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dc.contributor.authorPatient, David
dc.contributor.authorSkarlicki, Daniel
dc.contributor.editorGilliland, Stephen
dc.contributor.editorSteiner, Dirk
dc.contributor.editorSkarlicki, Daniel
dc.date.accessioned2020-06-02T07:13:17Z
dc.date.available2020-06-02T07:13:17Z
dc.date.issued2005
dc.identifier.isbn9781593114398
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/20.500.12127/6498
dc.description.abstractPrevious research shows that some managers do not deliver bad news in ways deemed interactionally fair (with dignity, respect, and adequate explanations). In this dissertation I explore whether specific individual characteristics predict the tendency to deliver bad news in ways regarded as interactionally (un) fair: the communicator's empathy, self-esteem, moral development, emotional intelligence, and moral identity.
dc.language.isoen
dc.publisherInformation Age Publishing
dc.subjectInteractional Fairness
dc.titleWhy managers don't always do the right thing when delivering bad news: The roles of empathy, self-esteem, and moral development in interactional fairness
dc.title.alternativeWhat motivates fairness in organizations?
dc.source.beginpage149
dc.source.endpage178
vlerick.knowledgedomainPeople Management & Leadership
vlerick.typebookBook Chapter
vlerick.vlerickdepartmentP&O
dc.identifier.vperid276185


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