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dc.contributor.authorPatient, David
dc.contributor.authorSkarlicki, Daniel
dc.date.accessioned2020-06-02T07:20:19Z
dc.date.available2020-06-02T07:20:19Z
dc.date.issued2010
dc.identifier.issn0149-2063
dc.identifier.doi10.1177/0149206308328509
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/20.500.12127/6509
dc.description.abstractThe authors report two studies exploring the role of a manager's empathy in delivering negative news more fairly. In Study 1, 132 practicing managers completed a scenario task in which a layoff was to be communicated. Trait empathic concern predicted interpersonal and informational justice of written messages. In Study 2, 81 students provided face-to-face feedback to a confederate, which was videotaped. An empathic induction resulted in higher levels of interpersonal and informational justice relative to a control group. Furthermore, the empathic induction had a greater effect on interpersonal and informational justice for communicators who were high (versus low) in moral development.
dc.language.isoen
dc.publisherSage
dc.subjectEmpathy
dc.subjectOrganizational Justice
dc.subjectMoral Development
dc.subjectManagerial Communication
dc.relation.embedded
dc.titleIncreasing interpersonal and informational justice when communicating negative news: The role of the manager's empathic concern and moral development
dc.identifier.journalJournal of Management
dc.source.volume36
dc.source.issue2
dc.source.beginpage555
dc.source.endpage578
dc.contributor.departmentCatholic University of Portugal
dc.contributor.departmentUniversity of British Columbia
vlerick.knowledgedomainPeople Management & Leadership
vlerick.typearticleFT ranked journal article
vlerick.vlerickdepartmentP&O
dc.identifier.vperid276185


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