Show simple item record

dc.contributor.authorWeber, Florian
dc.contributor.authorFehre, Kerstin
dc.contributor.editorFarache, F.
dc.contributor.editorGrigore, G.
dc.contributor.editorStancu, A.
dc.contributor.editorMcQueen, D.
dc.date.accessioned2020-10-28T08:22:32Z
dc.date.available2020-10-28T08:22:32Z
dc.date.issued2020en_US
dc.identifier.isbn9783030524661
dc.identifier.doi10.1007/978-3-030-52466-1_8
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/20.500.12127/6583
dc.description.abstractIn times when numerous scandals have challenged companies’ social legitimacy, CSR might serve as a legitimacy booster. But which is the most effective CSR strategy for improving legitimacy? This study examines how corporate social responsibility activity (CSRA) and corporate social responsibility communication (CSRC) impact legitimacy. The empirical results indicate that neither CSRA nor CSRC has a standalone effect; nonetheless, CSR is important for legitimacy: A CSR strategy that combines high levels of CSRA with low levels of CSRC emerges as the most effective for (re)gaining legitimacy, while an opposite strategy that combines low levels of CSRA with high levels of CSRC emerges as the worst.en_US
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.publisherPalgraveen_US
dc.subjectCSR
dc.subjectStrategy
dc.subjectCommunication
dc.subjectLegitimacy
dc.titleCSR strategies for (re)gaining legitimacyen_US
dc.title.alternativeValues and corporate responsibility. CSR and sustainable developmenten_US
dc.source.beginpage187en_US
dc.source.endpage208en_US
vlerick.knowledgedomainStrategyen_US
vlerick.typebookBook Chapteren_US
vlerick.vlerickdepartmentEGSen_US
dc.identifier.vperid242144en_US


This item appears in the following Collection(s)

Show simple item record