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dc.contributor.authorGevers, Josette
dc.contributor.authorLi, Jia
dc.contributor.authorRutte, Christel G.
dc.contributor.authorvan Eerde, Wendelien
dc.date.accessioned2022-10-27T19:31:06Z
dc.date.available2022-10-27T19:31:06Z
dc.date.issued2020en_US
dc.identifier.issn0963-1798
dc.identifier.doi10.1111/joop.12287
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/20.500.12127/7126
dc.description.abstractIn a longitudinal field study of 37 professional project teams over almost 2 years, we investigated the dynamic relationship between perceptual shared cognition and team potency in predicting team performance. Our main results show that initial levels and change in perceptual shared cognition explain team performance outcomes through initial levels and change in team potency, respectively. Thereby, our findings confirmed that initial levels and change in team potency operated as an explanatory mechanism for the relationship between shared cognition and team performance. Interestingly, shared cognition change shows larger benefits on team performance outcomes than initial levels. In addition, we show differential relationships of task- and time-related shared cognition with the quality and timeliness criteria of team performance. Whereas shared task cognition predicts team performance in terms of both output quality and timeliness, shared temporal cognition predicts timeliness only. Altogether, this research suggests the unique theoretical value of change in perceptual shared cognition in explaining team performance and of affective-motivational team states as an alternative explanatory mechanism for the impact of shared cognition on team effectiveness.en_US
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.publisherWileyen_US
dc.subjectTeam Performanceen_US
dc.titleHow dynamics in perceptual shared cognition and team potency predict team performanceen_US
dc.identifier.journalJournal of Occupational and Organizational Psychologyen_US
dc.source.volume93en_US
dc.source.issue1en_US
dc.source.beginpage134en_US
dc.source.endpage157en_US
dc.contributor.departmentEindhoven University of Technology, The Netherlandsen_US
dc.contributor.departmentTilburg University, The Netherlandsen_US
dc.contributor.departmentUniversity of Amsterdam, The Netherlandsen_US
dc.identifier.eissn2044-8325
vlerick.knowledgedomainPeople Management & Leadershipen_US
vlerick.typearticleVlerick strategic journal articleen_US
vlerick.vlerickdepartmentPOen_US
dc.identifier.vperid300489en_US


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