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dc.contributor.authorButler, Rika
dc.contributor.authorButler, Martin
dc.date.accessioned2023-11-09T13:33:14Z
dc.date.available2023-11-09T13:33:14Z
dc.identifier.issn2056-4961
dc.identifier.doi10.1108/ICS-09-2017-0067
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/20.500.12127/7285
dc.description.abstractPurpose Phishing attacks exploit social vulnerabilities and remain a global concern. Financial institutions often use their websites as part of their online awareness and education efforts. This paper aims to explore the effectiveness of phishing-related information made available by financial institutions to raise awareness and educate customers. Design/methodology/approach In this mixed methods research, a survey of online consumers was first performed and analysed. Second, the information available on the websites of major financial institutions was analysed. Using the construct of information quality (IQ), content analysis was performed to determine whether the phishing-related information meets the IQ criteria. Findings The survey confirmed that consumers are indeed targeted by phishers. It established that they turn to their financial institutions, more often than any other source, for anti-phishing information. When analysing the IQ of phishing-related information, significant deficiencies as well as different levels of performance between the financial institutions, emerged. In general, the worst performing IQ criteria was information being current and fit for purpose. Research limitations/implications As the research is conducted within South Africa, the results cannot be generalised. The ethical clearance did not allow for identification of the different financial institutions and thus comparing consumers’ perceptions with the observed IQ from the content analysis to determine correlation. Practical implications Protecting consumers against phishing attacks remains critical, and this paper confirms that users turn to their financial institutions for information. Yet, the phishing-related information made available on the websites of financial institutions has severe deficiencies. Practitioners should use IQ to determine the appropriateness of phishing-related information and focus on improving customer awareness and education. Originality/value Researchers often highlight the importance of awareness and education programmes in protecting consumers, but rarely investigate if consumers access publicly available information and express an opinion on the quality of this information. Although the results should not generalised, the recommendations, if necessary through similar analysis, has an impact beyond the geographical constraints of the study.en_US
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.publisherEmerald Group Publishingen_US
dc.subjectSouth Africaen_US
dc.subjectPhishing Awarenessen_US
dc.subjectPhishingen_US
dc.subjectInformation Qualityen_US
dc.subjectOnline Securityen_US
dc.subjectFinancial Securityen_US
dc.titleAssessing the information quality of phishing-related content on financial institutions’ websitesen_US
dc.identifier.journal2018en_US
dc.source.volume26en_US
dc.source.issue5en_US
dc.source.beginpage514en_US
dc.source.endpage532en_US
dc.contributor.departmentSchool of Accountancy, Stellenbosch University, Stellenbosch, South Africaen_US
dc.contributor.departmentBusiness School, Stellenbosch University, Stellenbosch, South Africaen_US
dc.identifier.eissn2056-4961
vlerick.knowledgedomainDigital Transformationen_US
vlerick.knowledgedomainOperations & Supply Chain Managementen_US
vlerick.typearticleJournal article with impact factoren_US
vlerick.vlerickdepartmentTOMen_US
dc.identifier.vperid149670en_US


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