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dc.contributor.authorGoedertier, Frank
dc.contributor.authorWeijters, Bert
dc.contributor.authorVanpaemel, Pieter
dc.date.accessioned2024-01-31T06:18:37Z
dc.date.available2024-01-31T06:18:37Z
dc.date.issued2023en_US
dc.identifier.doi10.3390/su152416571
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/20.500.12127/7381
dc.description.abstractIn the global fight against climate change, stimulating eco-driving could contribute to the reduction of CO2 emissions. Company car drivers are a main target in this challenge as they represent a significant market share and are typically not motivated financially to drive more fuel efficiently (and thus more eco-friendly). As this target group has received little previous research attention, we examine whether digitally administered feedback and coaching systems can trigger such company car owners to drive eco-friendly. We do so by using respondents (employees of a financial services company (N = 327)) that voluntarily have a digital device (‘dongle’) installed in their company car, which monitors and records driving behavior-related variables. In a longitudinal real-life field study, we communicate eco-driving recommendations (e.g., avoid harsh braking, accelerate gently, etc.) to the respondent drivers via a digital (computer) interface. Over a 21-week time frame (one block of seven weeks before the intervention, seven weeks of intervention, and seven weeks after the intervention), we test whether eco-driving recommendations in combination with personalized, graphical ‘eco-score index evolution’ feedback increase eco-driving behavior. We also experimentally evaluate the impact of adding social comparison elements to the feedback (e.g., providing feedback on a person’s eco-driving performance compared to that of the same car brand users). Structural Equation Modeling (in MPlus 8.4) is used to analyze data. Our results show that digitally administered personal performance feedback increases eco-driving behavior both during and after the feedback intervention. However, we do not observe increased effects when social comparison information is added to the feedback. As this latter element is surprising, we conclude with a reflection on possible explanations and suggest areas for future research. We contribute to the sustainable eco-driving literature by researching an understudied group: company car drivers. More specifically, we contribute by demonstrating the effectiveness of digitally administered personal performance feedback on eco-driving for this group and by observing and reflecting on the (in)effectiveness of feedback containing social comparison information.en_US
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.publisherMDPIen_US
dc.subjectEco-Drivingen_US
dc.subjectDigital Interfaceen_US
dc.subjectFeedbacken_US
dc.subjectSocial Comparisonen_US
dc.subjectCompany Carsen_US
dc.titleThe longitudinal effect of digitally administered feedback on the eco-driving behavior of company car driversen_US
dc.identifier.journalSustainabilityen_US
dc.source.volume15en_US
dc.source.issue4en_US
dc.contributor.departmentFaculty of Psychology & Educational Sciences, Ghent University, Henri Dunantlaan 2, 9000 Gent, Belgiumen_US
dc.contributor.departmentEdgard & Cooper, Spinnerijstraat 101, 8500 Kortrijk, Belgiumen_US
dc.identifier.eissn2071-1050
vlerick.knowledgedomainMarketing & Salesen_US
vlerick.typearticleJournal article with impact factoren_US
vlerick.vlerickdepartmentMKTen_US
dc.identifier.vperid50332en_US


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