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dc.contributor.authorGoedertier, Frank
dc.contributor.authorWeijters, Bert
dc.contributor.authorVan den Bergh, Joeri
dc.date.accessioned2024-06-07T12:19:05Z
dc.date.available2024-06-07T12:19:05Z
dc.date.issued2024en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/20.500.12127/7488
dc.description.abstractThis study explores consumer preferences for brands that emphasize sustainability and inclusivity, and for brands perceived as exclusive and trendy. Consumer data obtained via a large-scale survey involving 24,798 participants across 20 countries and one special administrative region (SAR) are used to understand how willingness to pay (WTP) for these brand types varies globally, accounting for demographic factors like generation, gender, and country. A substantial body of literature highlights growing consumer interest in brands that stand for sustainability and inclusivity, challenging traditional notions that luxury and exclusivity primarily drive brand value. Despite persistent skepticism among some business executives about consumers’ actual versus claimed willingness to spend more for sustainable and inclusive brands, academics and commercial researchers increasingly signal a shift in purchasing behavior that is influenced by socio-ecological factors. This research aims to provide empirical data on consumer WTP across different demographics and countries/regions, thereby contributing to academic discussions and offering insights for managerial decision making. The study frames its investigation around four research questions, to explore how consumers’ WTP for exclusive and inclusive brands varies across generations, genders, and countries/regions. It employs a robust methodological approach, using confirmatory factor analysis (CFA) and structural equation modeling (SEM) to analyze the data. This ensures that the constructs of brand inclusiveness and exclusivity are comparable across diverse cultural contexts. Significant gender, generational, and country/region differences are observed. When comparing generations, the findings indicate that GenZ consumers have a higher WTP for sustainable/inclusive brands (compared to older, GenX, and Baby Boomer generations). Similar patterns are found when considering WTP for exclusive, on-trend brands. In terms of gender, women are observed to have a higher WTP for sustainable/inclusive brands, but a lower WTP for exclusive, on-trend brands compared to men. Finally, compared to consumers originating from certain European countries, we find that consumers living in certain Asian countries/regions have a significantly higher WTP for inclusive and sustainable brands, as well as for exclusive/on-trend brands. The study underscores the complexities of consumer behavior in the global market, highlighting the coexistence of traditional preferences for exclusive, trendy brands and preferences for brands that embrace sustainability and inclusivity.en_US
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.subjectSustainable Brandsen_US
dc.subjectInclusive Brandsen_US
dc.subjectExclusive Brandsen_US
dc.subjectWillingness to Pay (WTP)en_US
dc.subjectConsumer Preferencesen_US
dc.titleWillingness-to-pay for brands that aim for inclusivity, sustainability and positive societal contribution vs. willingness-to-pay for brands that are perceived as exclusive, on-trend: generational, gender and country differencesen_US
vlerick.conferencedate26/09/2024-29/09/2024en_US
vlerick.conferencelocationParis, Franceen_US
vlerick.conferencename2024 ACR Annual Conferenceen_US
vlerick.conferenceorganiserThe Association for Consumer Research (ACR)en_US
vlerick.knowledgedomainMarketing & Salesen_US
vlerick.typeconfpresConference Presentationen_US
vlerick.vlerickdepartmentMKTen_US
dc.identifier.vperid50332en_US


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