• Earnings Management and Debt

      Sercu, Piet; Vander Bauwhede, Heidi; Willekens, Marleen (KU Leuven, Dep. of Applied Economics, 2006)
    • Effects of top team conflict on new venture innovation

      Collewaert, Veroniek; Sapienza, Harry J. (2011)
    • Empirisch onderzoek naar underpricing van beursintroducties op de Beurs van Brussel

      Rogiers, Bart; Manigart, Sophie; Ooghe, Hubert (UGent, Fac. Economie & Bedrijfskunde, 1993)
    • Employee lay-off under different modes of restructuring

      Coucke, Kristien; Pennings, Enrico; Sleuwaegen, Leo (Vlerick Business School, 2005)
    • Employment implications of downsizing strategies and reorientation practices: an empirical exploration

      Dewettinck, Koen; Buyens, Dirk (2002)
      The aim of this study is to investigate the employment implications of different downsizing approaches. Thereforewe executed 19 case studies in Belgian organizations that recently were confronted with downsizing. Based on the results empirical study a two-dimensional categorization model is developed. The first continuum of the model represents the time frame (reactive to proactive) of downsizing strategies, while the second continuum represents the focus of reorientation practices towards the internal or external labor market. Based on this categorization scheme, employment implications were explored. Further, theoretical, managerial and governmental implications are suggested. Keywords: Downsizing, labor market, employee reorientation.
    • Engaging Social Media Services to Enhance Online Business Processes

      Basu, Amit; Muylle, Steve; Standaert, Willem (Cox School of Business, 2015)
    • Entry and exit of firms in a global economy: a cross-country and industry analysis

      Colantone, Italo; Sleuwaegen, Leo (2007)
      This paper examines the impact of international trade on firm entry and exit in Europe. The results point to strong displacement exit and less creative replacement entry in industries characterized by increasing import competition Moreover, the evidence suggests strong selection and higher entry barriers in industries characterized by higher openness through the export channel. The negative effects of trade openness lose importance if the increasing trade exposure concerns intra-industry trade, mainly coupled with international sourcing within the industry. Keywords: Globalization, Exit, Entry
    • Entry despite the network: Exploring the relationship between network structure and entry patterns in emergent organizational populations

      Manigart, Sophie; Clarysse, Bart; Debackere, Koenraad (UGent, Fac. Economie & Bedrijfskunde, 1994)
    • EU 2050 low-carbon energy future: visions and strategies

      Meeus, Leonardo; Azevedo, Isabel; Marcantonini, Claudio; Glachant, Jean-Michel; Hafner, Manfred (Florence School of Regulation, 2011)
      Other working paper not VBS
    • European integration: the third step

      Bowen, Harry; Sleuwaegen, Leo (Vlerick Business School, 2004)
      A perception of declining EU competitiveness has intensified calls for structural reforms within the EU. This paper examines recent evidence on changes in relative EU competitiveness and considers the observed changes in relation to the evolving competitive environment facing EU firms during the past two decades. Our analysis suggests that recent declines in EU competitiveness reflect an adjustment (or lack thereof) within the EU in response to an evolutionary “Third Step” in the process of EU integration: global market integration. We find that, starting from the mid-1990s, the EU began to face unprecedented increases in external sources of competition. The rising competition from external sources has created pressures for EU firms to alter their organizational and product market strategies to meet the challenge of a globally integrating market. While many leading EU firms are found to have responded to this challenge, EU firms remain hampered by anachronistic EU product and labor market regulations. The growing calls for structural reform therefore reflect the increased external competitive pressure on EU firms as they attempt to respond to growing global competition and to thereby strengthen their global competitiveness. JEL Classification: D21, F02, F23, L10, O40 Keywords: Competitiveness, European Integration, Foreign Competition, Globalization.
    • Evaluation of age-related labels by senior citizens

      Weijters, Bert; Geuens, Maggie (Vlerick Business School, 2002)
      The age-related labels ‘50+,' ‘senior'and ‘retired' are evaluated by a 45+ sample. Results show the appreciation of the terms increases upon entering the 50+ / senior / retirement group and keeps on increasing with age once the treshold age is crossed. The findings that label evaluations are generally positive and that 65 years is the mode of indicated treshold age for senior citizenship lead to an alternative interpretation of previous research (Tepper, 1994): people under 65 might consider being labeled ‘senior' undesirable because it is deviant from normality rather than because of the negativity of the label as such. Keywords: senior, 50+, age labels, marketing communications
    • Evidence and implications of zipf's law for integrated economies

      Bowen, Harry; Munandar, Haris; Viaene, Jean-Marie (2006)
      This paper considers the distribution of output and productive factors among members of a fully integrated economy (FIE) in which there is free mobility of goods and factors among members and whose members share the same technology. We first demonstrate that, within an FIE, each member's share of total FIE output and its shares of total FIE stocks of productive factors will be equal. If economic policies are largely harmonized across FIE members then this “equal-share” property implies that the growth in any member's shares of FIE output and factor stocks can be taken to be a random outcome. Building on Gabaix's (1999) result for the distribution of city sizes we argue that, if output and factor shares among FIE members evolve as geometric Brownian motion with a lower bound, then the limiting distribution of these shares will exhibit Zipf's law. We empirically examine for Zipf's law for the distribution of output and factor shares across two (presumably) integrated economies: the 51 U.S. states and 14 European Union (E.U.) countries. Our empirical findings strongly support Zipf's law with respect to the distribution of output, physical capital and human capital among U.S. states and among E.U. countries. These findings imply that models used to characterize the growth of members within an FIE should embody a key assumption: that the underlying growth process of shares is random and homogeneous across FIE members. JEL Classification: E13, F15, F21, F22, O57 Keywords: growth, economic integration, Zipf's law.
    • Exit in globalising industries: the role of international (out)sourcing

      Coucke, Kristien; Sleuwaegen, Leo (2006)
      This paper studies the impact of globalisation on the exit behaviour of domestic and foreign firms in the manufacturing industries of Belgium, one of the most open economies in the world. The strongest effects are found to come from rising import growth and rising multinational firms penetration of the industry, which systematically increase the probability of exit of (inefficient) domestic firms. Product differentiation and international (out)sourcing moderate this impact and lower the risk of exit. Controlling for productivity differences across firms, exporting on itself does not lower the probability of exit. Subsidiaries of multinational firms are found to be subject to similar disciplinary forces from import competition as domestic firms but do not show exit to respond to the same passive learning process. Keywords: Exit, Sourcing, International Competition
    • Explaining company-level influences on individual career choices: towards a transitional career pattern? evidence from belgium

      Soens, Nele; De Vos, Ans; Buyens, Dirk (2006)
      Although current career literature continues to build on the new career concepts that reflect a shift from ‘traditional' towards ‘transitional' career patterns, recent research presents a different reality. In Belgium, among other countries, the traditional career pattern remains the dominant picture on the labour market. This study seeks to explain this discrepancy between theory and practice by focussing on the meso-organizational influences on career choices of individuals. Drawing on Schmid's model of a transitional labour market, this qualitative empirical research explores the factors at company level that individuals point to as obstructing or facilitating career transitions. Results show that the existence of obstructing determinants at company level is one of the reasons why the ‘transitional career' hasn't become reality on the Belgian labour market yet. Implications for practitioners and policy makers are discussed.
    • Explicit and implicit determinants of fair-trade buying behavior

      Vantomme, D.; Geuens, Maggie; De Houwer, J.; De Pelsmacker, Patrick (Vlerick Business School, 2005)
      We examined the usefulness of an implicit attitude measure (IAT) to explain the weak attitude-behavior relationships often found in research about ethical consumer behavior. The results indicated that the IAT effects for buyers and non-buyers of Fair Trade products were significantly different, showing that the IAT can be used to differentiate between buyers and non-buyers. Further, the authors conclude that the IAT has unique predictive validity and that most importantly implicit attitudes need to be enhanced to raise ethical consumer behavior.
    • Exploring the bullwhip effect by means of spreadsheet simulation

      Boute, Robert (2007)
      An important supply chain research problem is the bullwhip effect: demand fluctuations increase as one moves up the supply chain from retailer to manufacturer. It has been recognized that demand forecasting and ordering policies are two of the key causes of the bullwhip effect. In this paper we present a spreadsheet application, which explores a series of replenishment policies and forecasting techniques under different demand patterns. It illustrates how tuning the parameters of the replenishment policy induces or reduces the bullwhip effect. Moreover, we demonstrate how bullwhip reduction (order variability dampening) may have an adverse impact on inventory holdings. Indeed, order smoothing may increase inventory fluctuations resulting in poorer customer service. As such, the spreadsheets can be used as an educational tool to gain a clear insight into the use or abuse of inventory control policies and improper forecasting in relation to the bullwhip effect and customer service. Keywords: Bullwhip effect, forecasting techniques, replenishment rules, inventory fluctuations, spreadsheet simulation