• Co-branding in advertising: the issue of product and brand-fit

      Geuens, Maggie; Pecheux, C. (2006)
      Three studies are conducted to investigate co-branding in advertising by manipulating product and brand fit. Polarity of brand images (positive or neutral) and the type of ad processing (top-down versus bottom up) were also taken into account. The results show that either product or brand fit is sufficient to produce positive attitudes towards the core brand in case of a high image core brand. However, these results do not hold for core brands with a neutral image. In that case, brands better team up with a brand possessing high product fit and/or a positive image instead of a similar image.
    • Healthy or unhealthy slogans: that's the question...

      Adams, Leen; Geuens, Maggie (2005)
      The present study focuses on social self-esteem of youngsters (i.e. esteem derived from approval of others), a widespread, important pursuit of youngsters in modern society. More specifically, we explored the relationship between social self-esteem on the one hand, and an individual difference measure, Need for Closure, and gender on the other hand. Results show that NFCL and gender significantly relate to social self-esteem values like eagerness for approval and tranquility, achievement pressure and competence orientation, individualism, independency and appearance mindedness. NFCL and gender also affect youngster's social esteem related self-images. In addition, interesting interaction effects were identified. Limitations and directions for future research are suggested. Keywords: Need for Closure, Values, Self-Image, Gender, Social Self-Esteem.
    • Is gender stereotyping in advertising more prevalent in masculine countries? A cross-national analysis

      De Wulf, Kristof; Odekerken-Schröder, Gaby; Hofstee, Natascha (2003)
      The objective of this study is to test whether gender stereotyping in printed advertising is more prevalent in masculine as opposed to feminine countries. We consider this to be important, as advertising is generally more influential than literature in spreading stereotypical ideas given its high accessibility. Moreover, the way in which sexes are portrayed in advertising affects people's perceptions of gender roles in real life. Using content analysis, we collected empirical data on gender stereotyping of women depicted in 946 printed advertisements from two European countries widely differing in their level of masculinity, the UK and the Netherlands. The results indicate that a country's masculinity index is hardly related to the use of gender stereotyping in printed advertising, potentially implying that other factors underlie the use of gender stereotyping. Key words: Gender stereotyping, UK and the Netherlands, advertising, content analysis, masculinity index