• Integrated performance management: adding a new dimension

      Verweire, Kurt; Van den Berghe, Lutgart (2003)
      In this paper, we argue that effective Integrated Performance Management (IPM) needs both strategic and maturity alignment. The management literature focuses on strategic alignment, in this paper we develop the concept of maturity alignment. Maturity alignment indicates that an organization must install the appropriate managerial and operational processes in accordance with the desired maturity level. We have identified four different maturity levels that indicate how well the organizational and managerial processes within an organization are defined and developed. We argue that insufficient maturity alignment is one of the major reasons why many performance management initiatives fail. Keywords Integrated performance management, strategic alignment, maturity alignment.
    • Modelling limited dependent variables: methods and guidelines for researchers in strategic management

      Bowen, Harry; Wiersema, Margarethe (2003)
      Research on strategic choices available to the firm are often modeled as a limited number of possible decision outcomes and leads to a discrete limited dependent variable. A limited dependent variable can also arise when values of a continuous dependent variable are partially or wholly unobserved. This chapter discusses the methodological issues associated with such phenomena and the appropriate statistical methods developed to allow for consistent and efficient estimation of models that involve a limited dependent variable. The chapter also provides a road map for selecting the appropriate statistical technique and it offers guidelines for consistent interpretation and reporting of the statistical results.
    • Toward an integrative framework of strategies that work

      Verweire, Kurt; Ferguson, Tamela; Debruyne, Marion (2007)
      Competitive strategy is at the heart of the field of strategic management. But despite years of academic research, there is a lot of debate about what constitutes competitive strategy and how effective competitive strategies lead to superior performance. In this article, we argue that strategy is about making clear choices (“focus”) and about being different (“differentiation”) on four strategic dimensions, including: Whom do we serve?, What do we provide?, What is our value proposition?, and How do we realize all this? Although recent work has pointed to these conclusions, this paper goes one step further by providing more concrete ideas as to what focus and differentiation really mean for each of the various dimensions and why they matter. As such, we provide managers a framework that can be used to test the extent to which their strategies have the potential to be effective.