• Determinants of negotiators's initial offer

      Buelens, Marc; Van Poucke, Dirk (Vlerick Business School, 2001)
    • Development of the loss aversion questionnaire

      De Baets, Shari; Buelens, Marc (2012)
    • Differences between private and public sector employees' psychological contracts

      Willem, Annick; De Vos, Ans; Buelens, Marc (2007)
      The extent to which private and public sector employees differ in the importance they attach to different types of inducements being part of their employment deal and their evaluations of these inducements is studied. We focus on five content dimensions of the psychological contract: career development opportunities, job content, financial rewards, social atmosphere and respect for private life. Data from a survey of 4956 Belgian employees show that, compared to private sector employees, public sector employees are motivated by other inducements. In particular, they attach less importance to career development opportunities and financial rewards promises in their psychological contracts, and perceive these promises as less fulfilled. Keywords: psychological contract, public sector employees, private sector employees, motivation
    • Different positive feelings leading to different ad evaluations: the case of coziness, excitement and romance

      Faseur, Tine; Geuens, Maggie (Vlerick Business School, 2005)
      This study contributes to the debate about the valence-based versus the multi-dimensional views of feelings. By conducting an experiment using 317 subjects, we compared the differential impact of three different positive feelings on ad effectiveness. Support for the multi-dimensional view of feelings was found in the sense that ad- and context-evoked coziness, excitement and romance had a different impact on attitudes to ads. Moreover, in the area of context effects further support for the multi-dimensional view of feelings was found: the exciting, the romantic and the cozy ads scored best after recounting a feeling-congruent story.
    • Digital strategy, the next level

      Muylle, Steve (2019)
      Digital Transformation is hot. In what way will digital developments contribute to the strategy and growth of your organisation? How do you develop digital challenges into digital success? In this white paper you will learn all about the core principles of a strong digital strategy. Are you ready to compete in a rapidly changing world? Read this white paper and tackle your organisational’s growth in a smart way.
    • Diversity, performance, and the influence of study-related variables: a meta-analysis

      van Dijk, Hans; Van Engen, Marloes; van Knippenberg, Daan (2009)
    • Do human capital and fund characteristics drive follow-up behaviour of early stage high-tech VCs?

      Knockaert, Mirjam; Lockett, Andy; Clarysse, Bart; Wright, Mike (Vlerick Business School, 2005)
      This paper uses a unique dataset to examine the neglected but important issue concerning the relationship between the human capital and fund characteristics of venture capitalists and post-investment follow-up behavior in early stage high tech investments. We found no indication that involvement in monitoring activities by the investment manager is determined by either fund or human capital characteristics. In relation to value-adding activities, human capital variables were the most important, with previous consulting experience and entrepreneurial experience contributing to a higher involvement in value-adding activities. Furthermore, the diversity of an investment manager's portfolio was negatively related to involvement in value-adding activities. Finally, with respect to fund level characteristics, we found that investment managers of captive funds were less involved in value-adding activities. Keywords: venture capital, early stage high tech firms, post-investment follow-up behavior, human capital, fund characteristics
    • Do intangible assets and pre-founding R&D efforts matter for innovation speed in start-ups?  

      Heirman, Ans; Clarysse, Bart (Vlerick Business School, 2004)
      The launch of the first product is an important event for start-ups, because it takes the new venture closer to growth, profitability and financial independence. However, entrepreneurship literature lacks theory and data on new product development and innovation speed. Integrating insights form new product development literature with resource-based theory, we construct a conceptual framework concerning the antecedents of innovation speed in start-ups. In particular, we argue that pre-founding R&D efforts and intangible assets such as team tenure, experience of founders, and collaborations with third parties are important for innovation speed. We collected a unique dataset on 99 research-based start-ups (RBSUs) and use an event-history approach to test our model. We find that RBSUs differ significantly in their starting conditions and that these differences have a significant effect on the time it takes to launch the first product. The impact of starting conditions on innovation speed differs however between software, medical-related, telecom and other technologies. Although intuition suggests that start-ups that are further in the product development cycle at founding launch their first product faster, we find that software firms starting with a beta-version experience slower product launch. Next, it is shown that team tenure and experience of founders leads to faster product launch. Contrary to expectations, alliances with other firms do not significantly affect innovation speed and collaborations with universities lead to longer development times. The insights of this study enhance our understanding of product development processes in start-ups and the differences between slow growers and fast growers. Keywords: Intangible assets, New Product Development and Start-Ups
    • Do intangible assets and pre-founding R&D efforts matter for innovation speed in start-ups?  

      Heirman, Ans; Clarysse, Bart (Vlaamse Overheid - Dep. EWI, 2004)
      The launch of the first product is an important event for start-ups, because it takes the new venture closer to growth, profitability and financial independence. However, entrepreneurship literature lacks theory and data on new product development and innovation speed. Integrating insights form new product development literature with resource-based theory, we construct a conceptual framework concerning the antecedents of innovation speed in start-ups. In particular, we argue that pre-founding R&D efforts and intangible assets such as team tenure, experience of founders, and collaborations with third parties are important for innovation speed. We collected a unique dataset on 99 research-based start-ups (RBSUs) and use an event-history approach to test our model. We find that RBSUs differ significantly in their starting conditions and that these differences have a significant effect on the time it takes to launch the first product. The impact of starting conditions on innovation speed differs however between software, medical-related, telecom and other technologies. Although intuition suggests that start-ups that are further in the product development cycle at founding launch their first product faster, we find that software firms starting with a beta-version experience slower product launch. Next, it is shown that team tenure and experience of founders leads to faster product launch. Contrary to expectations, alliances with other firms do not significantly affect innovation speed and collaborations with universities lead to longer development times. The insights of this study enhance our understanding of product development processes in start-ups and the differences between slow growers and fast growers. Keywords: Intangible assets, New Product Development and Start-Ups
    • Do not forget the strategic architecture of your manufacturing network while offshoring

      Vereecke, Ann; De Meyer, Arnoud (2006)
      Offshoring manufacturing to low labor cost countries has become trendy. Nearly everyday one sees an announcement in the business press of companies moving to China or India. Whilst production cost is an important consideration in choosing a location for the factory, we argue that one should not become victim of a herd effect and that other parameters e.g. quality, flexibility, transportation and energy costs, etc. need to be taken into consideration in the determination of the optimal manufacturing network. Relocating a factory is changing the strategic architecture of the company's manufacturing network and requires a long term view and a good model to design the architecture of the manufacturing network. Based on empirical survey research and a set of case studies we provide such a model to think about the roles of factories in the strategic manufacturing network of the firm. But we go beyond a classification and a descriptive model and we provide a set of six managerial issues that require senior management's attention in determining the optimal manufacturing network and its dynamic evolution. We argue for example that senior management needs to build a balanced portfolio of different types of factories, has to have a performance measurement system adapted to the type of factory, as well as the appropriate leadership for each of the different types of factories and needs to actively manage the dynamics and the flows of innovation in the factory network. Key words: international manufacturing, network management, outsourcing
    • Do R&D subsidies affect SME's: access to external financing

      Meuleman, Miguel; De Maeseneire, Wouter (2008)
    • Does cognitive style diversity affect performance in dyadic cooperations

      Vanderheyden, Karlien; De Baets, Shari (2012)
      The scope and purpose of this special issue is to reassess the relationships between private equity (PE) investors and their portfolio companies in the light of the need for venture capital/ private equity (VC PE) firms to adapt their strategies for value creation in the light of the recent financial crisis. We particularly focus upon VC PE characteristics that differently contribute to portfolio firm performance. The papers presented in this special issue capture this aim in various ways, reflecting the heterogeneity of VC PE investors and the firms in which they invest. We begin this introductory paper by providing a brief overview of each paper’s contribution. We articulate themes for an agenda for future research relating to the heterogeneity of investor types and the contexts in which they invest.
    • Does foreign direct investment crowed out domestic entrepreneurship?

      De Backer, Koen; Sleuwaegen, Leo (Vlerick Business School, 2002)
      In analyzing firm entry and exit across Belgian manufacturing industries, this paper presents evidence that import competition and foreign direct investment discourage entry and stimulate exit of domestic entrepreneurs. These results are in line with theoretical occupational choice models, where it is shown that crowding out of domestic entrepreneurs through foreign direct investment works through selection in product and labor markets. However, the empirical results also suggest important long term structural positive effects of FDI on domestic entrpreneurship as a result of learning, demonstration, networking and linkage effects between foreign and domestic firms which tend to moderate or even reverse crowding out effects on domestic entrepreneurship.
    • Does foreign investment crowd out domestic entrepreneurship?

      De Backer, Koen; Sleuwaegen, Leo (KU Leuven, Dep. of Applied Economics, 2001)
    • Does IT matter where immigrants work? Traded goods, non-traded goods, and sector specific employment

      Bowen, Harry; Pedussel, Jennifer (Vlerick Business School, 2004)
      Immigrant employment often concentrates in non-traded goods sectors and many immigrants have low inter-sectoral mobility. We consider these observed characteristics of immigrant employment for the question of how immigration affects a nation's pattern of production and trade. We model an economy producing three goods, one is non-traded. Domestic labor and capital are domestically mobile but internationally immobile. Some immigrant labor is specific to the non-traded sector. Our model indicates that the output and trade effects of immigration depend importantly on the sector and nature of immigrant employment. Empirical investigation of the model's predictions indicates that trade and immigration are complements. JEL classification: C23, D5, F16, F22, J61, O15 Keywords: trade, immigration, non-traded goods, specific factors, panel.
    • Does Timing of R&D Collaborations Explain the Heterogeneity of their Outcomes?

      Leten, Bart; Vanhaverbeke, Wim; Belderbos, Rene; Du, Jingshu
    • Drivers of cost system development in hospitals: results of a survey

      Cardinaels, Eddy; Roodhooft, Filip; Van Herck, Gustaaf (Vlerick Business School, 2004)
      While many hospitals are under pressure to become more cost efficient, new costing systems such as Activity-based costing (ABC) may form a solution. However, the factors that may facilitate (or inhibit) cost system changes towards ABC have not yet been disentangled in a specific hospital context. Via a survey study of hospitals, we discovered that cost system development in hospitals could largely be explained by hospital specific factors. Issues such as the support of the medical parties towards cost system use, the awareness of problems with the existing legal cost system, the way hospitals and physicians arrange reimbursements, should be considered if hospitals refine their cost system. Conversely, ABC-adoption issues that were found to be crucial in other industries are less important. Apparently, installing a cost system requires a different approach in hospital settings. Especially, results suggest that hospital management should not underestimate the interest of the physician in the process of redesigning cost systems. Keywords: Activity Based Costing, Organizational Change, Cost Control, Hospital context