• Relationship Marketing Effectiveness in Retailing: A Contingency Approach

      Odekerken-Schröder, Gaby; De Wulf, Kristof; Reynolds, K. (Maastricht Universiteit, 2000)
    • Research methods in negotiation: 1965-2004

      Buelens, Marc; Van De Woestyne, Mieke; Mestdagh, Steven; Bouckenooghe, Dave (2007)
      This study provides insight into the dominant methodological practices that have shaped the field of negotiation over the past four decades, and sheds light on possible gaps and trade-offs. We content analyzed 941 peer reviewed negotiation articles (published between 1965-2004) for methodology. We distinguished key issues in negotiation research and identified methodological trends over time (1965-2004). The results reveal significant changes in reliability, validity and triangulation issues. In addition, the rise of multivariate statistics and multiple data-sources displays a positive evolution towards more sophisticated methodologies. However, more attention is needed to address the enduring lack of longitudinal designs and qualitative techniques in negotiation research. Keywords: negotiation, research methodology, review, validity, triangulation
    • Response preference in organizational behavior research: do respondents to classical and internet surveys possess different psychological characteristics

      Mestdagh, Steven; Buelens, Marc (Vlerick Business School, 2003)
      The Internet has become a widespread tool for conducting research in organizational behavior. Little is known, however, of the psychological characteristics of Internet users. In the present study, differences in motivation, satisfaction, behavioral patterns and work outcomes are examined among respondents who had the choice of either filling in an online or a traditional pen-and-paper version of a large-scale Flemish survey (N=5853). Participants in both groups were mostly professional workers. After controlling for demographic variables, our results suggest that those who responded over the Internet place higher importance on opportunities for self-development and on assuming responsibility than those who opted for the pen-and-paper version. Moreover, Internet respondents appeared to be less satisfied with the content of their jobs and with their bosses. They also reported a significantly higher intention to leave the organization. Finally, the Internet group reported less compulsive work addiction, fewer health complaints, and less work-to-family conflict. The results allow us to conclude that Internet respondents more closely represent the image of the modern professional workforce, as often characterized in terms of shifting psychological contracts, values and career expectations. KEYWORDS: Internet Surveys, Organizational Behavior
    • Review of transmission tariff methods and practices in Europe

      Hadush, Samson Yemane; Buijs, P.; Belmans, Ronnie (2010)
    • Running head: values, value conflict and stress the prediction of stress by values and value conflict

      Bouckenooghe, Dave; Buelens, Marc; Fontaine, J.; Vanderheyden, Karlien (Vlerick Business School, 2004)
      The aim of this paper was to investigate the relationship between stress, values, and value conflict. Data collected from 400 people working in a wide variety of companies in Flanders indicated that the values openness to change, conservation, self-transcendence, self-enhancement, and value conflict were important predictors of stress. Participants open to change reported less stress, while respondents scoring high on conservation, self-enhancement, and self-transcendence perceived more stress. People reporting high value conflict also experienced more stress. Separate analyses for the male and female subsamples demonstrated that sex differences regarding the relationship between the four value types and stress cast new light on the findings for the total sample. The article concludes with a discussion of the results and future research directions.
    • Running your company the smart way. How industry 4.0 will change the way you do business

      Boute, Robert; Isik, Öykü; Kleer, Robin; Muylle, Steve; Vanderheyden, Karlien; Vereecke, Ann (2019)
      Everyone is talking about Industry 4.0 – from the Internet of Things, additive manufacturing and the cloud through to artificial intelligence, augmented reality and blockchain. But what does it all mean in practice? It’s not a question of if Industry 4.0 will drastically change the way we do business. It’s a question of when and how quickly. So how can you apply this technology in your business – not just to improve production and performance, but to make a difference for customers? This white paper gives you the insight you need to get ahead of the game and prepare your organisation for the fourth industrial revolution.
    • Searching the heffalump: using traits and cognitive styles to predict entrepreneurial orientation

      Cools, Eva; Van den Broeck, Herman (2006)
      The aim of this study was to get more insight into what typifies Flemish entrepreneurs. We compared entrepreneurs with non-entrepreneurs for five traits (tolerance for ambiguity, self-efficacy, proactive personality, locus of control, need for achievement) and for cognitive styles. Additionally, we used these trait and cognitive characteristics to predict variances in entrepreneurial orientation (EO). Whereas the link between EO and organizational performance has been studied intensively, the examination of possible antecedents of EO remains a white space. We found that entrepreneurs (N = 177) score significantly higher on all traits than non-entrepreneurs (N = 60). For the cognitive styles (measured with the Cognitive Style Indicator), we found that non-entrepreneurs score higher on the knowing and planning style. No differences were found for the creating style. With regard to the link between the entrepreneur's profile and EO, we found a significant contribution of tolerance for ambiguity and proactive personality to EO. Keywords: traits, cognitive styles, entrepreneurial orientation, entrepreneurs versus non-entrepreneurs
    • Segmenting the senior market: professional and social activity level

      Weijters, Bert; Geuens, Maggie (Vlerick Business School, 2003)
      A segmentation of the senior market is presented based on two dichotomous variables: social and professional activity / inactivity. The resulting four groups are labeled socially active employees, socially passive employees, socially active retirees and socially passive retirees. By means of analyses of variance, the main and interaction effects of the two segmentation bases on a wide range of consumer behavior related variables are investigated. Significant relations are found for (among others) personality, values, discretionary time, discretionary income, cognitive age, media usage, several aspects of purchasing behavior, and leisure activities.
    • Semi-annual earnings announcement and market reaction: Some recent findings for a small capital market

      Van Huffel, G.; Joos, Philip; Ooghe, Hubert (UGent, Fac. Economie & Bedrijfskunde, 1995)
    • Setting priorities in Healthcare. Investing in the right innovations at the right time

      Van Dyck, Walter; Verdonck, Pascal (2018)
      This white paper explores the current situation in the healthcare sector – and where it could be in the future. It outlines how we can make our health organisations more innovative – and crucially, how we can decide which ideas are worth investing in.
    • Simultaneous competitor and customer diffusion: a market growth model based on market space and competition

      Debruyne, Marion (2006)
      This paper addresses the interaction between competitive dynamics and market evolution. Specifically, it focuses on the development of the market of a new product, in terms of customer adoption as well as competitive entry. The objective of this paper is to develop a model for the growth stage of a new market that addresses the supplier and customer diffusion process and the interaction between them. The contribution of our approach is threefold: (i) the development of a competitor diffusion model, (ii) the combination of a competitor diffusion model with a customer diffusion model, recognizing the interplay between competitive entry and market-level diffusion, and (iii) the recognition that competitive entry effects in the diffusion model are endogenous, resulting from the entry decisions of firms.
    • Smart cities initiative: how to foster a quick transition towards local sustainable energy systems

      Meeus, Leonardo; Delarue, Erik; Azevedo, Isabel; Glachant, Jean-Michel; Leal, V.; de oliveira Fernandes, E. (Florence School of Regulation, 2010)
    • Smart regulation for smart grids

      Meeus, Leonardo; Saguan, Marcelo; Glachant, Jean-Michel; Belmans, Ronnie (Florence School of Regulation, 2010)
    • SMES, FDI and financial constraints

      De Maeseneire, Wouter; Claeys, Tine (2007)
    • So I'm leaving...and now what? Exploring drivers of the decision to sell upon entrepreneurial exit

      Leroy, Hannes; Manigart, Sophie; Meuleman, Miguel; Collewaert, Veroniek (2010)
    • Socially responsible investment: differences between Europe and the United States

      Louche, Céline; Lydenberg, Steven (2006)
      Since the early 1970s, Socially Responsible Investment (SRI) has grown from a curiosity and niche-market phenomenon in the financial world to become a global movement, which is embraced now in most countries around the world. The paper focuses on the development and practices of SRI in the United States and Europe. The aim is to explore the historical, cultural and political embeddedness of SRI. Based on second sources of information, it offers a comparative analysis of the development and current practices of SRI on both sides of the Atlantic and discusses the future trends for SRI. The paper shows that SRI movements in both regions present some differences in terms of definitions, actors involved, vocabulary and motivations, and strategies implemented. However, they also share a common underlying purpose and seeking similar goals of improving corporations' policies and practices on social and environmental issues. Key words: Socially Responsible Investment, Europe, United States