Now showing items 1-20 of 6348

    • Quantify-me: consumer acceptance of wearable self-tracking devices

      Pfeiffer, Jurij; von Entreß-Fürsteneck, Matthias; Urbach, Nils; Buchwald, Arne (2016)
      The usage of wearable self-tracking technology has recently emerged as a new big trend in lifestyle and personal optimization in terms of health, fitness and well-being. Currently, only little is known about why people plan or start using such devices. Thus, in our research project, we aim at answering the question of what drives the usage intention of wearable self-tracking technology. Therefore, based on established technology acceptance theories, we deductively develop an acceptance model for wearable self-tracking technologies which sheds light on the pre-adoption criteria of such devices. We validate our proposed model by means of structural equation modeling using empirical data collected in a survey among 206 potential users. Our study identifies perceived usefulness, perceived enjoyment, social influ-ence, trust, personal innovativeness, and perceived support of well-being as the strongest drivers for the intention to use wearable self-tracking technologies. By accounting for the influence of the demographic factors age and gender, we provide a further refined picture.
    • Understanding employee engagement in un-official projects–A conceptual model based on psychological empowerment and constructive deviance

      Buchwald, Arne; Urbach, Nils; Mähring, Magnus (2015)
      Un-official projects resulting from unsanctioned, bottom-up employee initiatives is a phenomenon that can cause serious resource planning problems in IT project portfolio management, such as when resources thought to be available have actually been spent on projects conducted under the radar. At the same time, such project may also give rise to innovative ideas, solutions and software of potentially great benefit to organizations. Previous research has begun to acknowledge and highlight the innovative potential in bottom-up un-official activities, but little is known about why individual professionals engage in un-official projects. We draw on psychological empowerment and constructive deviance theory to explain such engagement, identifying factors fostering empowerment as well as factors moderating whether empowerment translates into unofficial project activities. Our conceptual model contributes to the theoretical discourse on un-official projects and equips practitioners with knowledge that can help them balance the propensity of individuals to engage in un-official activities.
    • Towards explaining the use of self-tracking devices: conceptual development of a continuance and discontinuance model

      Buchwald, Arne; Letner, Albert; Urbach, Nils; von Entreß-Fürsteneck, Matthias (2015)
      Users of digital self-tracking devices benefit from information about themselves. Thereby, the explanatory power of this information heavily depends on post-adoption continued usage of these devices. Thus, the aim of our research is to empirically analyze the factors that lead to continuous use of self-tracking devices. So far, research has largely focused on phases until IS adoption in a work environment and little on postadoption use in a consumer context which centers on either continuance or discontinuance. To advance research in this area, we develop a conceptual model that combines both in one comprehensive model by building on established post-adoption theories. We will continue our research with a quantitative-empirical evaluation of the developed model. With our research, we aim at contributing to both a better theoretical understanding in the field of IS post-adoption in a consumer context and giving practical implications for producers of self-tracking devices.
    • Understanding the organizational antecedents of bottom-up un-enacted projects - Towards a conceptual model based on deviance theory

      Buchwald, Arne; Urbach, Nils; Ahlemann, Frederik (2014)
      Un-enacted projects are those projects that have not been officially evaluated by the project portfolio management but do exist although they are not known to a company's project portfolio. As a consequence, resources thought to be available often prove to be actually unavailable and that unofficial initiatives eventually compete for scarce resources. One particular type of these un-enacted projects are bottom-up initiatives. Bottom-up un-enacted projects are unofficial initiatives on which employees spend time without order but with which they intend to benefit their organizations. While previous research highlights the great potential of bottom-up un-enacted projects, they only focus on the individual level but leave the organizational level for further research. To address this research gap, this study aims at gaining a deeper understanding of the organizational drivers of bottom-up un-enacted projects. We draw on deviance theory to develop a conceptual model for explaining the occurrence of these projects. In order to triangulate the emerging model with insights from practice, we use interview data to cross-check and refine the theory-driven model. Our results advance the theoretical discourse on the concept of un-enacted projects and enable practitioners to understand the levers with which to steer respective activities in the intended direction.
    • Understanding IT governance success and its impact: Results from an interview study.

      Urbach, Nils; Buchwald, Arne; Ahlemann, Frederik (2013)
      Owing to the increasing regulatory pressure and the need for aligned IT decisions, governance of IT has become important for both academia and practice. However, knowledge that integrates the determinants and consequences of IT governance success remains scarce. Although some studies investigate single aspects of IT governance success and its impact, none of these combine these factors into a comprehensive and integrated model. To address this gap, our research aims at understanding what factors influence and result from successful IT governance, and at determining how they can be translated into a model to explain IT governance success and its impact. Therefore, we conducted 28 interviews in 19 companies across different industries. Based on the analysis, we present a model that helps understanding what factors make IT governance successful and how IT governance contributes to an IT …
    • Exploring the role of un-enacted projects in IT project portfolio management

      Buchwald, Arne; Urbach, Nils (2012)
      From the IT governance point of view, one central project portfolio management task is to ensure that official projects draw upon assigned human resources. However, a common phenomenon is that resources thought to be available often turn out to be actually unavailable. Previous research indicates that numerous unofficial initiatives are a typical cause of this observation. These un-enacted projects are those projects that have not been officially evaluated but do exist although they are not known to a company’s project portfolio. The result is that unofficial initiatives compete for scarce resources. Despite these resource issues, previous research has barely investigated unenacted projects. By building on four in-depth case studies, this exploratory study investigates the major drivers of the occurrence of un-enacted projects and their specific characteristics and found a great variety in respect of the type of un-enacted projects and the reasons for them being triggered in organizations.
    • Will I or will I not? Explaining the willingness to disclose personal self-tracking data to a health insurance company

      von Entreß-Fürsteneck, Matthias; Buchwald, Arne; Urbach, Nils (2019)
      Users of digital self-tracking devices increasingly benefit from multiple services related to their self-tracking data. Vice versa, new digital as well as “offline” service providers, such as health insurance companies, depend on the users’ willingness to disclose personal data to be able to offer new services. Whereas previous research mostly investigated the willingness to disclose data in the context of social media, e-commerce and smartphone apps, the aim of our research is to analyze the influence of the privacy calculus of personal risks and benefits on the willingness to disclose highly personal and confidential self-tracking data to health insurance companies. To do so, we develop a conceptual model based on the privacy calculus concept and validate it with a sample of 103 respondents in a scenario-based experiment using structural equation modeling. Our results reveal that privacy risks always have a negative impact on the willingness to disclose personal data, while positive effects of privacy benefits are partly depending on the data sensitivity.
    • Insights into personal ICT use: Understanding continuance and discontinuance of wearable self-tracking devices

      Buchwald, Arne; Letner, Albert; Urbach, Nils; von Entreß-Fürsteneck, Matthias (2018)
      Wearable self-tracking devices become increasingly common in our society and reflect the trend towards the digitized individual. However, little is known what drives the continuance and dis-continuance usage of such devices. To empirically analyze factors leading to continuance and discontinuance of wearable self-tracking device usage, we develop a conceptual model based on established post-adoption concepts and the dual-factor theory. We validate it by applying structural equation modeling on collected survey data among 357 self-tracking users. Whereas previous research focuses on predicting continuance intentions, our results reveal discontinu-ance to be another decisive determinant of usage behavior. Additionally, we provide insights into factors driving continuance and discontinuance intentions and derive practical implications for producers. Our results advance the theoretical discourse on IS post-adoption behavior in a personal ICT context.
    • Towards explaining the willingness to disclose personal self-tracking data to service providers

      Buchwald, Arne; Letner, Albert; Urbach, Nils; von Entreß-Fürsteneck, Matthias (2017)
      Users of digital self-tracking devices increasingly benefit from multiple services related to their self-tracking data. Simultaneously, service providers are dependent from these data to offer such services. Thereby, the willingness of users to provide such personal data heavily depends on benefits and risks associated with the disclosure. In this regard, the aim of our research is to investigate the factors influencing the willingness to disclose personal self-tracking data to service providers. So far, IS re-search has largely focused on private information disclosure in social media and little in the health and behavior context. To advance research in this area, we develop a conceptual model based on the privacy calculus by building on established information disclosure and privacy theories. With our re-search, we aim at contributing to both a better theoretical understanding in the fields of privacy and information disclosure and giving practical implications for service provider.
    • Understanding the co-creation of value emerging from the collaboration between IT consulting firms and their customers

      Oesterle, Severin; Buchwald, Arne; Urbach, Nils (2016)
      Recent market developments such as increasing digitalization of services, professionalization of customers, and transparency about the specific value of IT services, are putting IT consulting firms as well as their customers under pressure. Thus, it is of high importance that IT consultancies and their customers are jointly working together to innovate new services and solve specific tasks which come along with the digitization of services. Although previous literature offers valuable starting points for explaining such collaborative value creation, we do not see specific approaches that comprehensively address this challenge. By drawing upon the service-dominant logic as the theoretical frame, we deductively develop a conceptual model that explains the emergence of cocreated value within IT consulting relationships. After a thorough empirical validation of our model, our ultimate contribution will be a theory that equips IT consulting firms and their customers with information to better understand the drivers of co-created value.
    • Less complex than expected–What really drives IT consulting value

      Oesterle, Severin; Buchwald, Arne; Urbach, Nils (2019)
      Digitalization has a broad impact and the risk of external disruption is omnipresent throughout all industries which also applies to IT consulting firms. One response to this threat is to understand better the determinants of how value is created during the joint work on an IT project. Although previous literature offers valuable starting points for explaining value co-creation, no previous research synthesizes service provider and client perspective in a comprehensive model and empirically explains the co-creation of IT consulting service value. We build on the service-dominant (SD) logic as the fundamental meta-theory and evaluate our deductively derived structural model based on 113 collected responses from IT consulting projects using structural equation modeling. Our major finding is that IT consulting service value only seems to be determined by consultant capabilities. Our findings provide new insights for SD logic and service science literature and potential for future research.
    • Motivation as determinant of bootlegging innovation

      Krueger, Alexander; Buchwald, Arne (2019)
      One key source of innovation is the individual employee, who can develop innovations either with or without the official authorization by management–the latter phenomenon is called bootlegging. Previous research focused mostly on structural determinants while little is known about individual determinants of bootlegging behavior. We relate two research streams that address deviance and motivation to develop a conceptual model that explains bootlegging behavior in the workplace. Based on the assumption that an innovating agent can simultaneously engage in compliant and in deviant innovative behavior (ie bootlegging), we conceptualize these distinctly different types of behavior as two dependent variables and derive intrinsic and extrinsic motivational sources as independent variables. Our conceptual model contributes to existing literature on individual-level determinants of bootlegging and offers a basis to further study workplace innovation.
    • Business value through controlled IT: Toward an integrated model of IT governance success and its impact

      Buchwald, Arne; Urbach, Nils; Ahlemann, Frederik (Journal of Information Technology, 2014)
      Owing to increasing regulatory pressure and the need for aligned information technology (IT) decisions at the interface of business and IT, IT governance (ITG) has become important in both academia and practice. However, knowledge of integrating the determinants and consequences of ITG success remains scarce. Although some studies investigate individual aspects of ITG success and its impact, none combine these factors into a comprehensive and integrated model that would lead to a more complete understanding of the ITG concept. To address this gap, our research aims at understanding what factors influence and result from successful ITG, and at determining how they can be translated into a model to explain ITG success and the impact thereof. Therefore, we conducted interviews with 28 IT decision makers in 19 multinational organizations headquartered in Europe. Our study synthesizes the fragmented previous research, provides new empirical insights gathered on the basis of a clear ITG conceptualization, and suggests three innovative constructs heretofore not related to ITG. Moreover, we elucidate in a holistic model the factors that make ITG successful, how ITG contributes to an IT organization’s success, and how it eventually unfolds throughout the overall organization. The resulting model allows organizational decision makers to develop an effective ITG implementation and to explain the implications of successful ITG, thus providing a justification for the respective investments.
    • Implikationen von inoffiziellen Projekten für die IT-Governance

      Buchwald, Arne; Urbach, Nils (HMD Praxis der Wirtschaftsinformatik, 2014)
      Aus der IT-Governance-Perspektive ist eine zentrale Aufgabe des Projektportfoliomanagements sicherzustellen, dass offizielle Projekte auf die ihnen zugewiesenen Ressourcen zugreifen können. In der Praxis ist dabei zu beobachten, dass Mitarbeiter, die laut offiziellen Planungen für ein bestimmtes Projektvorhaben vollständig verfügbar sein sollten, tatsächlich mit anderen Vorhaben beschäftigt und somit nicht in angenommenem Umfang verfügbar sind. Als zentrale Ursache wird das Auftreten inoffizieller Projekte angeführt. Dieser Fachartikel beschreibt die ersten Zwischenergebnisse einer Fallstudienforschung mit dem Ziel der Untersuchung, welche spezifischen Typen von inoffiziellen Projekten in den untersuchten Unternehmen auftreten und welche zentralen Treiber die Entstehung dieser Projekttypen beeinflussen. Darauf aufbauend werden die Implikationen für die Ausgestaltung der IT-Governance diskutiert und Handlungsempfehlungen für das strategische IT-Management abgeleitet.
    • IT-Governance als ganzheitlicher Rahmen für die Steuerung der Unternehmens-IT

      Urbach, Nils; Buchwald, Arne; Gschwendtner, Michael (Wirtschaftsinformatik & Management, 2013)
      Das Themengebiet IT-Governance ist in den letzten Jahren insbesondere im Zusammenhang mit den Diskussionen über die Geschäftsorientierung der IT in den Blickpunkt geraten. Der Begriff IT-Governance wird von einer Vielzahl von Parteien reklamiert, die sich mit den unterschiedlichsten Aspekten von IT in Unternehmen befassen. Dazu gehören neben unternehmensinternen IT-Verantwortlichen beispielsweise Unternehmensberater, Auditoren und Hersteller von IT-Tools [1]. Die Auffassungen über die Ziele, Inhalte und Verantwortlichkeiten von IT-Governance erscheinen dabei in der Unternehmenspraxis jedoch ebenso uneinheitlich und vielschichtig wie in der einschlägigen Literatur.
    • IT-Outsourcing ist kein Selbstläufer

      Buchwald, Arne; Urbach, Nils; Würz, Tobias (Wirtschaftsinformatik & Management, 2014)
      Obwohl Unternehmen und IT-Dienstleister mit der Auslagerung von IT-Aufgaben mittlerweile jahrzehntelang Erfahrung gesammelt haben, ist die erfolgreiche Umsetzung von IT-Outsourcing-Vorhaben nach wie vor kein Selbstläufer. So ist in der Praxis auch 25 Jahre nach dem ersten größeren IT-Outsourcing weiterhin eine hohe Erfolgsvarianz zu beobachten.
    • Outsourcing: Wie man seine Ziele erreicht

      Buchwald, Arne; Urbach, Nils; Würz, Tobias (Computerworld, 2015)
      Beim Auslagern von IT-Dienstleistungen kann man viel falsch machen. Wenn die Ziele nicht erreicht werden, liegen die Gründe weniger in der gewählten Strategie als vielmehr in der operativen Umsetzung.
    • Daten als Wirtschaftsgut: Ökonomische Perspektive

      Krueger, Alexander; Buchwald, Arne (2019)
    • To measure is to know: Development of an instrument for measuring consulting service value

      Oesterle, Severin; Buchwald, Arne; Urbach, Nils (2019)
      While their fundamental business model has not changed for many decades, consulting firms are currently faced with serious challenges putting the complete market at the risk of disruption. Given that situation, it is essential for consultancies to understand how value emerges in consulting projects in the eyes of their clients. Turning to the customer perspective, it is also important to understand how value emerges from the relationship with consultancies. While previous literature provides valuable but fragmented starting points to explain the joint value creation in IT consulting projects, we suggested a synthesized conceptual model drawing on the service-dominant logic in a previous article that integrates both the service provider and client perspectives. In this article, we now put forth a measurement instrument that we subjected to a preliminary empirical validation with which the important determinants in both spheres can be assessed to ultimately explain the value of the IT consulting service in a follow-up, large-scale quantitative-empirical validation.