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dc.contributor.authorWetzel, Ralf
dc.contributor.authorVan Gorp, Lore
dc.date.accessioned2017-12-02T14:52:33Z
dc.date.available2017-12-02T14:52:33Z
dc.date.issued2014
dc.identifier.doi10.1108/JOCM-01-2013-0007
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/20.500.12127/4853
dc.description.abstractPurpose - The purpose of this paper is to explore, how organization theoretically diverse research on OCR is actually grounded, since insights into the organization theoretical foundations of OCR are completely lacking. Design/methodology/approach - A selection of 85 articles on organizational change was made, published in top tier journals in 2010. The authors conducted a reference analysis based on 18 prominent organization theories and their main contributing authors. Findings - The findings show firstly a very strong theoretical selectivity, focusing on cognitive, learning, and neo-institutional theories. Other theories are almost fully neglected. Secondly, this analysis suggests that current OCR struggles hard with transforming the cognitive frames of topical OT into fruitful accesses to the own object. The resulting theory application appears as a dissatisfying escape strategy, performed to cover theoretical antagonisms and to avoid a deeper confrontation with the underlying assumptions of OCR. Research limitations/implications - The authors are fully aware that the depth of their analysis is worth broadening. A more comparable scope in the amount of the theories, journals, articles, and of the covered time span would help to substantiate their results. Practical implications - Pragmatic change approaches rely strongly on organizational change research. If OCR itself is not topical in terms of using available theoretical knowledge, pragmatic approaches fail to stand on solid ground. The paper therefore provides a background for the link between failing empirical change projects and the usage of available scientific knowledge. Originality/value - An analysis of the organization theoretical topicality of organizational change research is completely missing. The paper therefore not only contributes to the discovery of a blind spot in organizational studies, it possibly helps to explore the reasons for the high percentage of failing change projects.
dc.language.isoen
dc.subjectLiterature Review
dc.subjectOrganization Theory
dc.subjectOrganizational Change Research
dc.subjectTheoretical Antagonism
dc.titleEighteen shades of grey? An explorative literature review into the theoretical flavours of organizational change research
dc.identifier.journalJournal of Organizational Change Management
dc.source.volume27
dc.source.issue1
dc.source.beginpage115
dc.source.endpage146
vlerick.knowledgedomainPeople Management & Leadership
vlerick.typearticleJournal article with impact factor
vlerick.vlerickdepartmentP&O
dc.identifier.vperid142491
dc.identifier.vperid136964
dc.identifier.vpubid5786


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