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dc.contributor.authorTran, Phuong
dc.contributor.authorGorton, Matthew
dc.contributor.authorLemke, Fred
dc.date.accessioned2022-09-22T09:52:44Z
dc.date.available2022-09-22T09:52:44Z
dc.date.issued2022en_US
dc.identifier.issn0019-8501
dc.identifier.doi10.1016/j.indmarman.2022.08.009
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/20.500.12127/7105
dc.description.abstractSupplier development initiatives, instituted by buyers, may have both positive (performance improvement) and negative (supplier opportunism) outcomes. Consequently, it is important to understand the factors that increase the likelihood of positive outcomes and decrease supplier opportunism. Drawing on Social Exchange Theory, we introduce and validate a model whereby socially embedded commitments mediate the effects of investment in suppliers on supply chain outcomes. Structural Equation Modelling, utilizing a sample of 204 buyers in the fruit and vegetable supply chain in Vietnam, indicates that supplier development not only improves buyer performance, but also simultaneously increases supplier opportunism. However, the degree to which supplier development initiatives lead to positive or negative consequences depends on goal congruence and long-term orientation. The design of supplier development initiatives should, thus, be geared to fostering suppliers' long-term orientation and goal congruence between parties.en_US
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.publisherElsevieren_US
dc.subjectSupplier Developmenten_US
dc.subjectOpportunismen_US
dc.subjectPerformance Improvementen_US
dc.subjectSocial Exchange Theoryen_US
dc.subjectVietnamen_US
dc.titleBuyers' perspectives on improving performance and curtailing supplier opportunism in supplier development: A social exchange theory approachen_US
dc.identifier.journalIndustrial Marketing Managementen_US
dc.source.volume106en_US
dc.source.issueOctoberen_US
dc.source.beginpage183en_US
dc.source.endpage196en_US
dc.contributor.departmentSchool of International Business - Marketing, University of Economics Ho Chi Minh City, 59C Nguyen Dinh Chieu street, District 3, Ho Chi Minh city, Viet Namen_US
dc.contributor.departmentSchool of Management, University of Bristol, Howard House, Queens Avenue, Bristol BS8 1SD, United Kingdomen_US
dc.contributor.departmentNewcastle University Business School, Newcastle University, 5 Barrack Road, Newcastle upon Tyne NE1 4SE, United Kingdomen_US
dc.identifier.eissn1873-2062
vlerick.knowledgedomainMarketing & Salesen_US
vlerick.typearticleVlerick strategic journal articleen_US
vlerick.vlerickdepartmentMKTen_US
dc.identifier.vperid186039en_US


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