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dc.contributor.authorDe Langhe, Bart
dc.date.accessioned2023-02-20T04:55:40Z
dc.date.available2023-02-20T04:55:40Z
dc.date.issued2016en_US
dc.identifier.issn2326-568X
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/20.500.12127/7170
dc.description.abstractBusiness decisions are increasingly based on data and statistical analyses. Managerial intuition plays an important role at various stages of the analytics process. It is thus important to understand how managers intuitively think about data and statistics. This article reviews a wide range of empirical results from almost a century of research on intuitive statistics. The results support four key insights: (1) Variance is not intuitive; (2) Perfect correlation is the intuitive reference point; (3) People conflate correlation with slope; and (4) Nonlinear functions and interaction effects are not intuitive. These insights have implications for the development, implementation, and evaluation of statistical models in marketing and beyond. I provide several such examples and offer suggestions for future research.en_US
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.publisherNow Publishers Inc.en_US
dc.subjectBehavioral Decision Makingen_US
dc.subjectMarketing Researchen_US
dc.subjectMarketing Decisions Modelsen_US
dc.subjectFinancial markets: Anomalies and Behavioral Financeen_US
dc.subjectFinancial Markets: Portfolio Theoryen_US
dc.titleThe marketing manager as an intuitive statisticianen_US
dc.identifier.journalJournal of Marketing Behavioren_US
dc.source.volume2en_US
dc.source.issue2-3en_US
dc.source.beginpage101en_US
dc.source.endpage127en_US
dc.contributor.departmentUniversity of Colorado, USAen_US
dc.identifier.eissn2326-5698
vlerick.knowledgedomainMarketing & Salesen_US
vlerick.typearticleJournal articleen_US
vlerick.vlerickdepartmentMKTen_US
dc.identifier.vperid300832en_US


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